Ligatus Summer School 2011

 

The History of European Bookbinding 1450-1830 and Identifying and recording bookbinding structures for conservation and cataloguing.

Istituto Ellenico di Studi Bizantini e Postbizantini di Venezia, Venice (Italy)

19-23 and 26-30 September 2011

The 6th Ligatus Summer School, following the success of the courses in Volos, Patmos, Thessaloniki and Wolfenbüttel, is to be held this year in collaboration with the Istituto Ellenico di Studi Bizantini e Postbizantini di Venezia. We are delighted to announce the summer school in the historic city of Venice and particularly in the Istituto Ellenico, which has a distinguished reputation in the field of book studies. This year students will have the opportunity to see bindings from historic collections in the city, including the Biblioteca Marciana. With access to a range of important libraries and the unique environment that the city offers, this year’s summer school will be a unique experience.
http://www.ligatus.org.uk/summerschool

Summer school context:
The contribution that bindings can make to our understanding of the history and culture of the book is often neglected, but they can offer insights into the study of readership, the booktrade, and the provenance of books which are often not available elsewhere. In order to realise this potential, it is important to understand not only the history of the craft but also to learn how to record what is seen in a consistent and organised way. Librarians, cataloguers, conservators, book historians and all scholars who work with early books, need therefore to understand the structure and materials of the bindings they encounter in order to be able to record and describe them. Such descriptions of bindings are not only valuable for the management of library collections, pursuing academic research and making informed decisions about conservation, but are also important for digitisation projects as they can radically enrich the potential of image and text metadata. It is our belief that bindings should be seen as an integral part of the book, without which, our understanding of the history and use of books is often greatly circumscribed.

The purpose of the summer school is to uncover the possibilities latent in the detailed study of bookbinding and it mainly focuses on books which have been bound between the fifteenth and the early nineteenth century. While both courses concentrate in particular on the structure and materials of bookbindings, each of the two courses offered in this summer school looks at bindings from different geographical areas and with a different approach. The first course looks at the history of bookbinding as it was carried out in Europe in the period of the hand press (1450-1830), with the opportunity to look at examples from different collections during the afternoons, while the second course looks at the development of bookbinding in the eastern Mediterranean and gives hands-on training in how to observe and record bindings, again working with examples from the collections. Part of this course includes technical hands-on session for the development of a digital documentation system for recording bookbindings.

The courses are taught in English and each is open to 12 participants. Although the courses can be attended individually, participants are encouraged to attend both courses in order to get a more complete understanding of the issues discussed, through the comparison of the wide range of bookbindings considered in each week. Since these are not beginner-level courses, the participants are expected to be familiar with bookbinding terminology and have a basic knowledge of the history of book production in the periods under discussion. A basic understanding of the use of databases is also desirable for those who will attend the course in the second week.

Description of courses:

  • Week 1, European Bookbinding 1450-1830
    Tutor: Professor N. Pickwoad
    This course will follow European bookbinding from the end of the Middle Ages to the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, using the bindings themselves to illustrate the aims and intentions of the binding trade. A large part of the course will be devoted to the identification of both broad and detailed distinctions within the larger groups of plain commercial bindings and the possibilities of identifying the work of different countries, cities, even workshops without reference to finishing tools. The identification and significance of the different materials used in bookbinding will be examined, as well as the classification of bookbindings by structural type, and how these types developed through the three centuries covered by the course. The development of binding decoration will be touched on, but will not form a major part of the discussion. The course consists of ten 90-minute sessions with Powerpoint
    presentations (over 800 images will be shown). Actual examples of bindings will be shown in the first four afternoon sessions while the final afternoon will look at bookbinding terminology and offer the opportunity for the discussion of questions and issues raised during the week.
  • Week 2, Identifying and recording bookbinding structures
    Tutors: Dr. G. Boudalis and Dr. A. Velios
    This five-day course will be divided in two interconnected sessions. The first session, run by Dr. Georgios Boudalis, will focus upon the major structural and decorative features of the Byzantine and post-Byzantine bookbindings and their evolution in time and space. The relationship of these bindings with the early bindings of the Coptic and other Eastern Mediterranean cultures will be discussed, during lectures, slide-shows and demonstrations of real bookbindings from Venetian collections. This session will centre on the influences and comparisons of these different bookbindings. It will consist of eight 90-minute computer presentations supplemented by hands-on sessions. The second session will be run by Dr. Athanasios Velios and will deal with the data management and storage of bookbinding descriptions. Alongside a brief reference to the relational databases this session will mainly involve discussions on a) the semantic web and XML, b) schemas and terminologies for bookbinding descriptions, c) commercial and open source software options and d) methodologies and workflows for surveying collection. A large part of this session will be devoted to the actual development and use of a documentation system for recording binding structures and the actual recording of specific bindings. This session will consist of two 90-minutes presentations and eight 90-minutes hands-on workshops. Basic knowledge of database use is desirable for this course.

The courses are supported by Ligatus and the University of the Arts, London, with generous help from the Istituto Ellenico. We have therefore been able to reduce the cost of the course for this year to £350.00 per week, excluding travel, meals and accommodation. A number of accommodation options will be provided to the participants. A detailed schedule of the courses can be sent upon request.

Applications, including a short CV can be submitted online (http://www.ligatus.org.uk/summerschool/). For information about registration please email Ewelina Warner (e.warner@camberwell.arts.ac.uk) and mark  the message subject with: ‘Ligatus Summer School’. A reading list will be sent to those who will attend the courses in advance. Deadline for applications is the 1st of July. The participants will be contacted by the end of July.

About the Istituto Ellenico:
The Hellenic Institute of Byzantine and Post-Byzantine Studies in Venice was founded in 1955 and is housed in the building of the former Flanghinis College. The Institute’s main objective is to study Byzantine and Post-Byzantine history – focussing primarily on the history of Greek territories under Latin domination, on the basis of Italian and in particular Venetian archives – and to publish the relevant historical sources. Its old library (belonging to the former Flanghinis College) includes 2,000 volumes produced by the Greek printing houses of Venice from the 16th to the 18th century. Most of these old books come from the printing houses of Glykis and Theodosiou, and are mainly ecclesiastical works and school texts; the new library includes 30,000 volumes. The
library also holds 41 Byzantine and Post-byzantine manuscripts from as early as the 12th century. The Institute’s archive holds an important collection of documents from as early as 1498 which capture the history of Greeks in Venice. For more information about the Institute see:
http://www.istitutoellenico.org/

About Venice in September 2011:
Venice always offers a number of great cultural activities including museums and churches. The summer school coincides with the Venice Biennale exhibition which is another good reason to join us this year. For a calendar of events in Venice see: http://www.comune.venezia.it/flex/FixedPages/IT/Eventi.php/L/EN/YY/2011/MM/9/DD/1

About Ligatus:
Ligatus is a research unit of the University of the Arts London with particular interest in the history of bookbinding, book conservation, archiving and the application of digital technology to these fields. Ligatus’s main research projects currently include the conservation of the books in the library of St. Catherine’s Monastery on Mount Sinai and the development of a multi-lingual glossary of bookbinding terms. Find out more about Ligatus here: http://www.ligatus.org.uk

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InterFace 2011 Call for Talks Deadline extended

With apologies for cross-posting.

The committee for the 3rd International Symposium for Humanities and Technology, InterFace 2011, has agreed to extend the deadline for applications for participation in the symposium to

  *Friday 11 March 2011*

Applications are encouraged from Ph.D students and early career researchers in all humanities and computing disciplines. The key component of your application will be a 150-word abstract for your proposed lightning talk.

You can submit your application here:

http://www.interface2011.org.uk/submit

The committee will select participants from among the applications received and successful applicants will be informed on Monday 4 April 2011. If your application is accepted, you will then be invited to register. A participation fee will be charged to cover costs of lunches, refreshments, venue, and speakers. This fee will be £35.

Key Dates:

* Friday    11 March   Extended Deadline for applications
* Monday     4 April   Notification of successful applications
* Monday    18 April   Deadline for registration for successful applicants
* Wednesday 27 July    InterFace 2011 begins

What is InterFace?
==================

InterFace is a symposium for humanities and technology. In 2011 it is being jointly hosted by colleges across London and will be an invaluable opportunity for participants to visit this active hub of digital scholarship and practice.

The symposium aims to foster collaboration and shared understanding between scholars in the humanities and in computer science, especially where their efforts converge on exchange of subject matter and method. With a focus on the interests and concerns of Ph.D students and early career researchers, the programme will include networking activities, opportunities for research exposition, and various training and workshop activities.

A core component of the programme will be a lightning talks session in which each participant will make a two-minute presentation on their research. The session will be lively and dynamic. Each presentation must be exactly two minutes long, making use of necessary,interesting, appropriate, or entertaining visual or sound aids, and condensing a whole Ph.D’s worth of ideas and work into this short slot.

Participants will be able to join workshops in:

  • Data Visualisation
  •  lead by *Andy Hudson Smith* (UCL, Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis) http://www.casa.ucl.ac.uk/people/person.asp?id=7

  • Network Analysis
  •  lead by *Tom Brughmans* (Southampton) and *Marco Buechler*

  • Semantic Web
  • lead by *Joe Padfield* (National Gallery)

  • Bibliographic Software
  • lead by *Ian Mulvany* (VP New Product Development, Mendeley)

    There will be talks on:

  • User Studies
  • given by *Claire Warwick* (UCL, Information Studies)

  • How to Get Published
  • given by *Sarah-Louise Quinnell* (http://www.phd2published.com/) and representatives from Ashgate Publishing.

  • How to Get Funding in the EU and UK
  • given by *Henreitte Brun* (UCL, Laws Faculty)

    There will also be two keynote talks given by speakers whose work marks the leading edge of technology in scholarship and practice. The speakers will be:

    *Melissa Terras* (UCL)

    Digitisation of Cultural Heritage and Image Processing

    *Stephen Scrivener* (University of the Arts, London)

    Design Research and Creative Production

    Finally, the symposium will conclude with an unconference; a participatory, collaborative, and informal event in which the form and content is decided on by participants as it unfolds and in which discussion and production is emphasised over presentation and analysis. Participants may wish to share their own skills, learn a new skill, establish and develop a collaborative project, or hold a focused discussion.

    We look forward to receiving your application.

    The InterFace 2011 Committee

    http://www.interface2011.org.uk/
    enquiries@interface2011.org.uk


    Raffaele Viglianti
    PhD Candidate and PGRA
    Centre for Computing in the Humanities
    King’s College London

    Release of TEI 1.9.0

    The new release of the TEI Guidelines in all its forms is now complete. You can find it by:

  • visiting the TEI Web site and reading the Guidelines athttp://www.tei-c.org/release/doc/tei-p5-doc/en/html/index.html
  • using the schemas etc direct from the web site eg http://www.tei-c.org/release/xml/tei/custom/schema/relaxng/tei_all.rng
  • using Roma at http://www.tei-c.org/Roma/
  • downloading a zip archive from Sourceforge (https://sourceforge.net/projects/tei/files/TEI-P5-all/)
  • subscribing to Ubuntu/Debian packages via http://tei.oucs.ox.ac.uk/teideb/
  • checking out the source files using Subversion from Sourceforge (see https://sourceforge.net/scm/?type=svn&group_id=106328)
  • The nice folks at oXygen will include it all in their next release, I am sure.

    The release notes can be found at http://www.tei-c.org/release/doc/tei-p5-doc/readme-1.9.html

    Please note that this is an interim, largely procedural, release, and has no major additions or changes in functionality.  The TEI Council has been working to simplify the maintenance and releasing of the Guidelines, and it seemed sensible to clear the decks now and resolve any problems in implementation. This could mean another procedural release if something goes hideously wrong :-{

    The TEI Council meets in April and expects to make a release after that which addresses some of the backlog of feature requests.

    There are two important points to bear in mind:

    a) as discussed a few weeks ago, the implementation of global attributes has changed. Each element is now explicitly a member of the att.global class. If you have an ODD which adds new elements in the TEI namespace, it will no longer have global attributes (xml:id, rend etc) added by default.

    b) the web Roma tool has now switched to pass all processing to the OxGarage server, which runs a later (improved) set of ODD-processing stylesheets. You may notice changes (I hope not!). The XSLT 1.0 ODD-processing stylesheets are now removed from the Stylesheets package as they will no longer give the right results.

    The 1.9.0 release of the TEI is accompanied by release 5.50 of the TEI Stylesheets package and release 4.3 of Roma. These are intimately connected, because of the global attributes, so don’t attempt to mix and match unless you know what you are doing.


    Sebastian Rahtz     
    Head of Information and Support Group, Oxford University Computing Services
    13 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6NN. Phone +44 1865 283431

    Deadline Extended: CFP: Proceedings of 2010 TEI Conference and Members Meeting

    The Editors of the Journal of the Text Encoding Initiative are extending the deadline for Issue 2 (papers presented at the 2010 Members Meeting in Zadar) to Monday 11 April.

    Submissions will be accepted in two categories: research articles of 5,000 to 7,000 words and shorter articles reflecting poster session or lightning presentations, or new tools or services of 2000-4000 words. Both may include images and multimedia content.

    Full information for authors can be found here
    http://journal.tei-c.org/journal/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

    If you would like to discuss your a proposed submission with the Journal editors, please email journal [AT ] tei-c.org

    with all best wishes

    Susan Schreibman
    Editor-in-Chief

    MLA CFP: Session Sponsored by the Committee on Scholarly Editions

    MLA 2012: Seattle, January 5-8, 2012

    Reimagining the Scholarly Edition

    Over the past 15 years new theories of editing have broadened the approaches available to editors of scholarly editions. Noteworthy amongst these are the changes brought about by editing for digital publication. New methods for digital scholarship (including but not limited to text encoding, mashups, datamining), forms of editions (such as Thematic Research Collections, Digital Archives, Digital Libraries), theories informing digital publication (including Versioning, Genetic Editing, Unediting), and tools (such as TILE, the Versioning Machine, Omeka) offer exciting supplements or alternatives to traditional notions of the scholarly edition.

    Proposals are being accepted for this Roundtable (up to 8 presenters) that address the theme of digital scholary editons. Please email 300 word abstracts by March 10, 2011 to Susan Schreibman susan.schreibman [AT] gmail.com. All panel participants must be members of MLA before April 1, 2011.

    Women Writers Project’s Introduction to XSLT Workshop

    Space is still available in the Women Writers Project’s upcoming workshop on XSLT:

    Introduction to XSLT for Digital Humanities
    March 30-April 1, 2011
    Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island
    Instructors:
    Syd Bauman, Brown University
    David Birnbaum, University of Pittsburgh
    Cost: $300 ($200 for TEI members and students)
    Registration deadline: March 15, 2011

    This three-day intensive workshop will introduce participants to the fundamental concepts of XSLT, the power tool of the XML world, focusing on the needs and data of digital humanists. Participants will develop stylesheets that explore the basic capacities of XSLT, and will learn how to read and reverse engineer other people’s stylesheets to develop their skills. Familiarity with the TEI and XML is assumed.

    For more information, or to register for the workshop: http://www.wwp.brown.edu/outreach/seminars/

    Julia Flanders
    Director, Women Writers Project

    InterFace 2011: 3rd International Symposium for Humanities and Technology

    InterFace 2011 — 27-29 July 2011, University College London

    InterFace is a symposium for humanities and technology. In 2011 it is being jointly hosted by colleges across London and will be an invaluable opportunity for participants to visit this active hub of digital scholarship and practice.

    The symposium aims to foster collaboration and shared understanding between scholars in the humanities and in computer science, especially where their efforts converge on exchange of subject matter and method. With a focus on the interests and concerns of Ph.D students and early career researchers, the programme will include networking activities, opportunities for research exposition, and various training and workshop activities.

    A core component of the programme will be a lightning talks session in which each participant will make a two-minute presentation on their research. The session will be lively and dynamic. Each presentation
    must be exactly two minutes long, making use of necessary, interesting, appropriate, or entertaining visual or sound aids, and condensing a whole Ph.D’s worth of ideas and work into this short slot.

    Participants will be able to join workshops in:

    • social network analysis
    • bibliographic software
    • data visualisation
    • linked data

    There will be talks on:

    • user studies and social research
    • discourse analysis in science and technology
    • how to get your work published
    • how to apply for research funding

    There will also be two keynote talks given by speakers whose work marks the leading edge of technology in scholarship and practice. The speakers will be:

    • Steven Scrivener (University of Arts London) Design research and creative production
    • Melissa Terras (UCL) Digitisation of cultural heritage and image processing

    Finally, the symposium will conclude with an unconference; a participatory, collaborative, and informal event in which the form and content is decided on by participants as it unfolds and in which discussion and production is emphasised over presentation and analysis. Participants may wish to share their own skills, learn a new skill, establish and develop a collaborative project, or hold a focused discussion.

    We are now seeking applications for participation in InterFace. Applications are encouraged from Ph.D students and early career researchers in all humanities and computing disciplines. The key component of your application will be a 150-word abstract for your proposed lightning talk.

    You can submit your application here:

    http://www.interface2011.org.uk/submit

    The deadline for applications is Friday 25 February 2011.

    The committee will select participants from among the applications received and successful applicants will be informed on Monday 4 April 2011. If your application is accepted, you will then be invited to register. A participation fee will be charged to cover costs of lunches, refreshments, venue, and speakers. This fee will be £35.

    Key Dates:

    • Friday 25 February Deadline for applications
    • Friday 1 April Notification of successful applications
    • Monday 18 April Deadline for registration for successful applicants
    • Monday 27 July InterFace 2011 begins

    CFP: Proceedings of 2010 TEI Conference and Members Meeting

    This is a reminder of the open call for submissions to the TEI Journal. The deadline on Feb. 25 is only a few weeks away, so if you want to submit please do so in time at http://journal.tei-c.org/journal/. For your convenience, the call for papers is repeated below:

    The editors of the Journal of the Text Encoding Initiative, the official journal of the TEI Consortium, are delighted to announce a call for papers for the conference proceedings of the 2010 TEI Conference and Members Meeting. For this issue, the guest editors (Christian Wittern, Syd Bauman, and Hugh Cayless) welcome any article that was presented as a paper, poster, or tool demonstration at the conference.

    The Journal of the Text Encoding Initiative is a freely-available, open-access, peer-reviewed journal hosted by Revues.org. For further details on author and submission guidelines, please see the ‘About’ page.

    Closing date for submissions is 25 February 2011 with publication expected autumn 2011.

    XML Development: From Markup to Application

    April 25-28, 2011, Washington, DC

    Washington DC—The Association of Research Libraries (ARL) is pleased to offer an in-depth workshop focused on Web development with XML.

    Taught by experienced XML instructors and developers Matthew Gibson, Director of Digital Programs at the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities at the University of Virginia, and Patrick Yott, Digital Library Manager at Northeastern University, this four-day workshop will explore XML with a specific focus on fundamentals of design, markup, and use. Participants will use XML and related technologies in the creation of a prototype digital publication.

    Topics to be covered include:

    • XML: What is it? And why should we care about it?
    • Working with content models (primarily XML Schema and some Schematron) and methods of using them when constructing and validating XML
    • Implementing methods of content transformation and delivery (using XSLT and XPath) so the XML we build can be delivered, read, and used in a variety of formats
    • Utilizing Solr, a Lucene-based search server, and XSLT to deliver the final class project

    Participants should have a basic familiarity and some experience with markup (e.g., HTML, some XML, etc.).

    Event Details

    Dates: Monday, April 25 – Thursday, April 28, 2011
    Time: 9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
    Location: George Washington University Marvin Center, Washington, DC
    Fee: $1,500
    Register by March 25, 2011, at http://www.arl.org/stats/statsevents/index.shtml.

    eMunch.no officially online

    The first version, a beta version, of the digital archive of Edvard Munch’s texts is now online at http://www.emunch.no/

    The archive is primarily in Norwegian, but we have start pages in English, French and German (links on flags in the top of the page, in the front page’s main part and in the red menu, so hopefully you’ll manage to find your way). The general information in French and German is limited, I’m afraid, but we will provide more in due time. The texts, mostly letters, written by Munch himself in French and German are directly accessible from the French and German pages. We provide translations in English and French of some of Munch’s texts.

    The encoding guidelines we have used are available in English, cf. the English page. There are also a few articles in English on Munch related themes. Guidelines for transcribing Munch’s texts in French and German are available in French and German alongside articles discussing Munch’s use of French and German.

    The general guidelines for transcribing Munch’s texts will be translated to English in due time. Eventually we will also provide a list of terms used to categorize Munch’s texts in Norwegian – English – French – German, to facilitate browsing even though the archive is in Norwegian. We hope to be able in the years to come to supply the archive with even more resources in English, French and German.

    We also plan to provide some information on the technical aspects of the website. In short, the website is built using Apache Cocoon and the eXist XML database. It is currently hosted by the Unit for Digital Documentation at the University of Oslo.

    We are happy to answer questions and hope to receive feedback from you.

    Thank you!

    Kind regards, Hilde Bøe


    Hilde Bøe
    Scholarly and Technical Editor

    hilde.boe@munch.museum.no | hildeboee@gmail.com
    http://emunch.no/
    http://www.munch.museum.no/

    Martin Mueller elected new Chair of the TEI

    It is with great pleasure that I am able to announce that Martin Mueller has been elected to be the next Chair and CEO of the TEI.

    Martin will be taking over during a time of great transition as the TEI changes to a fully democratic board and administrative structure.

    Martin will be assuming the chair’s role effective immediately in programme activity (e.g. on Council and on the Conference programme commitee). I will continue to lead on business and administrative matters until March 1, at which point Martin will take over all duties as Chair and CEO of the Consortium.

    Daniel O’Donnell

    TEI with Music Notation customization

    The Text Encoding Initiative Special Interest Group in Music is pleased to announce the results of a TEI-funded project to bring music encoding into TEI documents.

    Music, like many other art forms, is often mentioned, discussed and described in writings of various kinds. This applies to both historical and contemporary documents, even though the way of notating music has changed considerably in western history. In most cases, music notation enters the text flow in a way similar to figures, images or graphs. On other occasions, elements of music notation are treated as characters in running text.

    The TEI with Music Notation customization introduces a way of signalling the presence of music notation in text, but defers to other representations to describe the music notation itself, which is not covered by TEI guidelines. In fact, several commercial, academic and standard bodies have developed digital representations of music notation and, given the topic’s complexity, these representations often focus on different aspects and adopt different methodologies. Therefore, the customization defines a container element to encode the occurrence of music notation and allows linking to the data format preferred by the encoder. This element is called notatedMusic, which has been proposed to enter the TEI specifications and TEI’s namespace in a feature request available here for further discussion.

    The customization also allows the use of elements from the Music Encoding Iniative (MEI) format that is modelled on the TEI, aims to be independent from rendering software and provides encoding methods for different research approaches in musicology. MEI provides a vocabulary for the representation of Common Western Music Notation, mensural and neume notation and aims to offer extension mechanisms to include other notation systems and non-standard notational components. Moreover, it accommodates a number of modules to express declarative knowledge about the music being encoded, such as analysis, critical commentary,ambiguity, variants, etc. The MEI format was released in its first stable version in summer 2010.

    We would like to invite those of you who are interested in the encoding of texts which contain music notation to access the documentation, the ODD and the schema on the SIG’s webspace:

    http://www.tei-c.org/SIG/Music/twm/index.html

    We consider this output as a beta release and we are very interested in collecting comments, feedback and discussing possible use scenarios. Please join our mailing list if you would like to discuss any aspect of this customization.

    With kind regards,
    Raffaele Viglianti


    Raffaele Viglianti
    PhD Candidate and PGRA
    Centre for Computing in the Humanities
    King’s College London