Call for Nominations

Call for Nominations

Dear members of the TEI community,

The Text Encoding Initiative Consortium (TEI-C) invites nominations for election to the TEI-C Board and Technical Council.  Only one position is vacant on the Board, following the recent revision of the bylaws; six positions are vacant on the Council. Nominations for these should be sent to the nomination committee at nominations@tei-c.org by September 10, 2013.  The elections will take place via electronic voting prior to the annual Members’ Meeting in October 2013.

Nominations should include an email address for the nominee and should indicate whether the nomination is for Board or Council.

Self-nominations are welcome and common; TEI-C membership is not a requirement to serve on the Board or Council. All nominees should provide a brief statement of interest and biographical paragraph, and notice that, if elected, they will be willing to serve. Example candidates’ biographies from a previous election can be found at <http://www.tei-c.org/Membership/Meetings/2012/mm58.xml>.

  • The TEI-C Board is the governing body for the TEI Consortium, and is responsible for its strategic and financial oversight. The Board conducts its business by email correspondence, occasional telephone conferences, and at its annual meeting, for which travel subsidies are available.
  • The TEI-C Technical Council oversees the technical development of the TEI Guidelines. Candidates for Council should be reasonably experienced users of the Guidelines, and expertise/interest in specific areas is helpful. Council members also evaluate bug reports and feature requests, and have primary responsibility for editing and updating the Guidelines and its release packages.  Prospective candidates should be available for subsidized travel to one or two face-to-face meetings annually, and should be able to commit to ongoing work  during the course of the year. Candidates may wish to indicate whether you can expect institutional support for your service if elected (e.g., time allowance for service, help with expenses).

For more information on the Board, including a list of current members, please see: <http://www.tei-c.org/About/board.xml>.

For more information on the Council, including a list of current members, please see: <http://www.tei-c.org/Activities/Council/index.xml>.

Service in either group is an opportunity to help the TEI grow and serve its members better. If you have ideas about how to make the TEI stronger or can help it do a better job, please nominate yourself! Or, if you know someone who you think could contribute to TEI, nominate him or her.

Thank you,

Lou Burnard (for the TEI nominating committee)

Advertisements

TEI P5 version 2.3.0 released!

Dear TEI Community,

TEI P5 version 2.3.0 (Codename: Betty White) is now available from all the usual sources, such as the TEI-C website and SourceForge. The debian packages, TEI-C XSL, and oxygen-tei framework will be updated fairly soon. This release introduces both textual and schema-related changes, new features and a significant number of bug fixes. Mostly these are based on bug and feature request tickets submitted to SourceForge by the TEI community. If you notice anything that has changed in error, or want to submit additional changes, please do so on the http://tei.sf.net/ website.

We have continued in our aim of opening up the release process to as many different people on Council and in this case the newly elected Hugh Cayless (NYU Digital Library Technology Services) was the release technician. Able assistance was also given by several other council members on the TEI IRC channel (see http://wiki.tei-c.org/index.php/IRC for more information). As always this has produced a set of notes for how to improve the release process that will be fed back into http://www.tei-c.org/Activities/Council/Working/tcw22.xml for future releases. The greatest thanks are due not only to the TEI Technical Council for undertaking the work, but the TEI community for submitting tickets!

A text version of the release notes is below, but a version (with links) is available at: http://www.tei-c.org/release/doc/tei-p5-doc/readme-2.3.0.html

Many thanks to all,

James Cummings
(TEI Technical Council Chair)
====

TEI P5 version 2.3.0 release notes

This version of the TEI introduces new features and resolves a number of issues raised by the TEI community. As always, the majority of these changes and corrections are a consequence of feature requests or bugs reported by the TEI community, using the SourceForge tracking system. If you find something you think needs to change in the TEI Guidelines, schemas, tools, or website, please submit a feature request or bug ticket at http://tei.sf.net/ for consideration.

Since the last release (25 October 2012), the TEI Technical Council has closed 93 tickets entered in the SourceForge tracking system. During the same period 77 new tickets have been opened by the community according to https://sourceforge.net/projects/tei/stats/tracker?tracker=&dates=2012-10-25+to+2013-01-17.

Some of the highlights of the TEI P5 2.3.0 release include:

  • The creation of an att.source class resulting from http://purl.org/tei/bugs/3572502 in order to standardise the provision of the @source attribute for pointing to one or more sources of a bibliographic reference. Currently, the elements quoteqwriting, and egXML claim membership in this class.
  • A change of the att.sourced class to att.edition (to avoid confusion with the above), and the creation of an @edRef attribute to provide one or more pointers to the source edition in which the associated feature (e.g. page, column, or line break) occurs.
  • The addition of a schematron constraint to check that there is a @type attribute if there is a @subtype attribute; also abbr and title now get their @type from att.typed and so will now get a @subtype attribute as well.
  • The creation of a media element to indicate the location of any form of external media (such as an audio or video clip); also the creation of a new att.media class which provides@width, @height, and @scale attributes.
  • A change to label to claim membership in att.placement (for the @place attribute) and att.typed in response to http://purl.org/tei/fr/3527821
  • A tightening up of the use of morphological elements inside cit necessitating some of them to be wrapped in the gramGrp element in response to http://purl.org/tei/bug/3547289
  • Revising section 1.3.1.1.5 on XML Whitespace for further clarity in response to a community contribution.
  • Removal of the default value from the definition of the @marks attribute on quotation. It was decided that a default value is unhelpful since the element is optional and affects the interpretation of the whole document; also the content model of quotation was changed from one or more model.pLike elements to zero or more of these allowing it to not have any child elements.
  • The creation of listPrefixDef and prefixDef to define prefixing schemes used in data.pointer values, showing how abbreviated URIs using the scheme may be expanded into full URIs. This is a powerful mechanism for providing a method allowing full documentation of private URI schemes which are then able to be dereferenced using the information in the prefixDef element. New prose was added to describe this at 16.2.3 – Using Abbreviated Pointers
  • A change to elements which claim membership in model.certLike in that this class has been added to the content model of space in response to http://purl.org/tei/bugs/3565137 allowing them to now be used here.
  • The @type attribute on biblScope has been deprecated and replaced with a @unit attribute for greater clarity. The @type attribute will be removed at a future release.
  • The locusGrp element has been added to the content model of msItemStruct, giving encoders a choice between locus or locusGrp, in response to http://purl.org/tei/fr/3575433
  • The citedRange element has been added inresponse to http://purl.org/TEI/FR/3555191 in order to enable users to document in a bibliographic reference the range within a larger text that is being cited.
  • Many tickets reporting small bugs such as typos, inconsistencies, or places where greater clarity was needed in the Guidelines. The TEI Technical Council would encourage any such reports, so if you spot a problem, please do let us know by filing a bug at http://purl.org/tei/bug.

====

TEI P5 version 2.2.0 is released!

Dear TEI Community,

TEI P5 version 2.2.0 (Codename: Primrose Path) is now available from all the usual sources, such as the TEI-C website and SourceForge. The debian packages and TEI-C XSL will be updated soon. This release introduces both textual and schema-related changes, mostly based on bug and feature request tickets submitted to SourceForge by the TEI community. If you notice anything that has changed in error, or want to submit additional changes, please do so on the http://tei.sf.net/ website.

We have continued in our aim of opening up the release process to as many different people on Council and in this case Piotr Bański (Institut für Deutsche Sprache in Mannheim and Institute of English Studies at the University of Warsaw) was the release technician. Able assistance was also given by Martin Holmes (University of Victoria) who updated the oxygen-tei package. As always this has produced a set of notes for how to improve the release process that will be fed back into http://www.tei-c.org/Activities/Council/Working/tcw22.xml for future releases. The greatest thanks are due not only to the TEI Technical Council for undertaking the work, but the TEI community for submitting tickets!

A text version of the release notes is below, but a version (with links to tickets) is available at: http://www.tei-c.org/release/doc/tei-p5-doc/readme-2.2.0.html

Many thanks to all,

James Cummings
(TEI Technical Council Chair)

====
TEI P5 version 2.2.0 release notes

This version of the TEI introduces new features and resolves a number of issues raised by the TEI community. As always, the majority of these changes and corrections are a consequence of feature requests or bugs reported by the TEI community, using the SourceForge tracking system. If you find something you think needs to change in the TEI Guidelines, schemas, tools, or website, please submit a ticket at http://tei.sf.net/ for consideration.
Since the last release (16 June 2012), the Council has closed at least 82 tickets entered in the SourceForge tracking system, from 25 different members of the TEI community (10 more than in the previous release!). Full details may be found at http://tei.sf.net/ and an active list sorted by ticket number is also available. Ticket numbers are also referenced in the subversion ChangeLog, as usual, which records around 490 commits during this period.

1  Schema Changes

Some of the important or interesting schema-related changes include:
* After much discussion, the datatype and usage of the global attribute @rend was clarified. In response to 3519866, a new global @style attribute was created to allow local description of the source document’s appearance using a formal style definition language such as CSS
* Increasingly, the Technical Council is attempting to provide more consistent Schematron constraints for additional validation (3557497, 3548772, 3064757)
* A new <listApp> element was added, along with other improvements for recording critical apparatus (3497356)
* The model.glossLike class was subdivided, to ensure that only members such as <desc>, <precision>, or <equiv> appear in the content of appropriate elements. (3565137)
* The @scheme attribute on <keywords> was made optional (3554050)
* A new att.milestoneUnit class was created to ensure consistency in use of @unit (3537452)
* Tighter restrictions were imposed on the content model of <gi> and <att> (3535672)
* The content model of <table> was changed to allow model.divBottom (footers, etc.) at the bottom (3531957)
* The <idno> element is now allowed inside <person> and <place> (3440977)
* The <lg> element, after much debate, is now allowed inside <p> (3532022)
* In the content model of <editionStmt>, explicit reference to <respStmt> has been replaced with model.respLike for greater flexibility (3439587)
* <biblStruct> can now be used for patent citations: the <monogr> element now allows an <authority> and an <idno> but no <title>, and <imprint> now allows <classCode> and <classRef>. (3513147)

2  Textual Changes

Some of important textual changes in the Guidelines include:
* Correction of typos, clearer explanations, or provision of new examples in various sections of the Guidelines: (e.g. 3576189, 3573757, 3572375, 3571101, 3561766, 3553911, 3552973, 3549757, 3547934, 3545113, 3539329, 3538141, 3537574, 3536504, 3535717, 3522019, 3521714, 3521288, 3519772, and others)
* Standardization of use of em and en dashes in the Guidelines (3471119)
* Clarification on the use of XPath to point to readings from an external apparatus (3497369)
* New section (23.1) added referencing the application/tei+xml IANA-registered media type (3565152)
* Greater clarification of ISO language codes and consistency in our recommendations and use of @xml:lang (3454803)

3  Environment Changes

The TEI Technical Council continually strives to improve the underlying infrastructure used to edit, store, test, and publish the outputs it creates. During this release cycle some of these infrastructure changes include:
* The TEI source code now references its component parts by means of XInclude rather than by using system entities (3547869)
* TEI ODD processing now supports local modification of classes, so an element can claim membership of an attribute class (e.g. att.typed) while still redefining an element provided by the class locally (e.g. the @type attribute’s value list)
* The HTML generated from the Guidelines now uses relative links to make browsing them in the Jenkins continuous integration servers easier (3556966)
* Various improvements to ODD processing, improvements to the TEI build infrastructure, especially in the testing framework and Schematron constraints
* The marking of TEI P4 as ‘deprecated’ in oxygen packages
* Improvements to the handling of exemplars during the build process
* Provision of additional outputs (e.g. JSON and JSONP see release/xml/tei/odd/) as default release items
* Many changes have been made to the TEI-C Stylesheet library to support these changes, fix reported bugs, and provide new features

4  New release of TEI Lite

An updated version of the ever-popular TEI Lite tutorial has been included with this release in the Exemplars directory. This new version has been updated to take advantage of the many new features introduced in the TEI since its first appearance in 1996, but has not changed in its original design goal, of aiming to specify the 50 or so TEI elements likely to be useful to 90% of TEI projects. There are no plans to update this tutorial, but we will continue to check that it remains compatible with future releases.

Sincerely,

James Cummings
Chair of the TEI Technical Council


Dr James Cummings, James.Cummings@it.ox.ac.uk
Research Support, IT Services, University of Oxford

TEI Newsfeed move

We’ve been having problems with the TEI-C Newsfeed because the wordpress blog at the TEI SourceForge site was not letting people login. SourceForge are now in the process of getting rid of the ‘hosted apps’ which include the WordPress blog we had there. We have imported the news articles into a blog on https://textencodinginitiative.wordpress.com and hopefully this won’t cause too many problems.

-JamesC

Call for Papers: Journal of the TEI 5

Date: Thu, 05 Apr 2012 10:26:37 +0100
From: susan schreibman <susan.schreibman@gmail.com>
Subject: CFP: Issue 5 of the Journal of the TEI: TEI Infrastructures

TEI Infrastructures

CFP: Issue 5 of the Journal of the TEI

Submissions due 30 September 2012

http://journal.tei-c.org/

The TEI has proven to be one of the great success stories in the Digital Humanities. It has emerged as the de facto standard for online critical scholarly editions as well as a format that promotes interoperability and exchange. This success has also prompted a new direction in TEI research: the development of infrastructure to support TEI scholarship, comprising workflows, support for collaborative encoding, distributed annotation.

The editors of the Journal of the Text Encoding Initiative, the official journal of the TEI Consortium, are delighted to announce a call for papers for a special issue that focuses on TEI Infrastructures. For this issue, the guest editors (Tobias Blanke and Laurent Romary) welcome articles including:

* Infrastructures dedicated to the support of TEI-based research

* Requirements from annotation practices in Digital Humanities using TEI

* TEI as an Infrastructure across domains

* Especially the role of the TEI in infrastructural initiatives in the humanities

* Especially the use of TEI in Infrastructures to support collaborative editing and crowd-sourced editions

* Dynamic presentation interfaces for TEI-encoded text

* The TEI as an architectural component within national or international infrastructures (such as DARIAH, Europeana, Project Bamboo, TextGrid, etc.)

* The TEI as an architectural component in commercial and scholarly digital publishing infrastructures

* The TEI as a component within digital curation infrastructures

* Material, political, social, legal, and technical differences between building TEI-enabled tools and building TEI-aware infrastructure

Submissions are accepted in two categories: research articles of 5,000 to 7,000 words and shorter articles reflecting new research or new tools/services of 2000-4000 words. Both may include images and multimedia content. Author guidelines are available at http://journal.tei-c.org/journal/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

The Journal of the Text Encoding Initiative, a peer-reviewed open-access publication hosted by Revues.org, is the official journal of the TEI Consortium. Closing date for submissions to this issue is 30 September 2012 with publication expected Spring 2013.

If you have any questions, please contact journal-guest-editors-5@tei-c.org.

–Susan Schreibman, PhD
Long Room Hub Associate Professor in Digital Humanities
School of English
Trinity College Dublin
Dublin 2, Ireland

TEI Meeting 2012: Call for workshops/tutorials

From: “Pierazzo, Elena”
To: TEI-L@listserv.brown.edu
Subject: [TEI-L] TEI Conference and Members’ Meeting – Call for workshops and tutorials

Call for pre-conference workshop and tutorial proposals

TEI and the C(r|l)o(w|u)d
2012 Annual Conference and Members’ Meeting of the TEI Consortium
Texas A&M University, Initiative for Digital Humanities, Media, and Culture

* Workshop proposals due Wed 15 May 2012
* Meeting dates: Wed 7 November to Sat 10 November, 2012
* Workshop dates: Mon 5 November to Wed 7 November, 2012 (see separate call)

The TEI Conference and Members’ Meeting will be preceded by educational tutorials or workshops. The goal of the tutorials is to give an opportunity to learn more about the use of TEI markup under the guidance of experienced instructors and practitioners, whereas workshops are an opportunity for specific groups to meet and work together on a TEI related subject.
Workshops and tutorials range in length from a single morning or afternoon to a maximum of two days. Tutorials are run on a cost-recovery basis: a separate fee is charged of participants that is intended to cover the costs of running the tutorial. Workshops are expected to be free of charges.

If you are interested in proposing either a workshop or a tutorial for the 2012 Members’ Meeting and Conference, please submit your proposal as early as possible and before 15 May 2012 via conftool, the availability of which will be announced shortly. Expressions of interest should include as much as possible of the following information (the committee is willing to work with proposers in developing their proposals):
* A proposed topic
* A rationale explaining why this topic is likely to draw sufficient attention to the TEI community
* Preferred length of the event
* Infrastructural requirements
* (In the case of a tutorial) A proposed instructor or slate of instructors including brief
discussion of relevant experience, as well as a preliminary budget of your anticipated costs (if any).
* (In the case of a workshop) A core list of people who are likely to participate, keeping in mind that workshops are by essence open for participation
Organisational and infrastructure costs (e.g. coffee breaks and the like) will be determined later in conjunction with the local organising committee.

Tutorial proposals will be evaluated by the programme committee primarily on the basis of their likely appeal to the TEI community, the quality of the proposed instructors and method of instruction, and cost. The committee will work with selected organizers after this date to refine the details of their proposals.

Please send queries to meeting@tei-c.org.

For the International Programme Committee,

Elena Pierazzo (chair)
——-
Dr Elena Pierazzo
Lecturer in Digital Humanities
Chair of the Teaching Committee
Department of Digital Humanities
King’s College London
26-29 Drury Lane
London WC2B 5RL

Phone: 0207-848-1949
Fax: 0207-848-2980
elena.pierazzo@kcl.ac.uk
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/ddh

TEI Conference and Members’ Meeting 2012: Call for Papers

Dear TEI Community,

It is my great pleasure to issue the Call for Paper for the forthcoming TEI conference and Members Meeting.

All the best wishes
Elena

==========================
Call for papers and proposals

TEI and the C(r|l)o(w|u)d
2012 Annual Conference and Members’ Meeting of the TEI Consortium
Texas A&M University, Initiative for Digital Humanities, Media, and Culture

* Deadline for submissions: May 15, 2012
* Meeting dates: Wed 7 November to Sat 10 November, 2011
* Workshop dates: Mon 5 November to Wed 7 November, 2012 (see separate call)

The Programme Committee of the 2012 Annual Meeting of the Text Encoding
Initiative (TEI – http://www.tei-c.org) Consortium invites individual paper proposals, panel
sessions, poster sessions, and tool demonstrations particularly, but
not exclusively, on digital texts, scholarly editing or any topic
that applies TEI to its research.

Submission Topics

Topics might include but are not restricted to:

  • TEI and Google Books
  • Handicraft vs. Large Scale Digitization: a False Dichotomy?
  • TEI and massive digital collections
  • TEI and Recording Document Corrections
  • TEI and “Dirty” OCR
  • TEI Schemas and Document Publication History
  • Text vs. Document: Can the TEI semantics express both?
  • TEI and text corpora
  • The relation between representation (encoded text) and presentation (visualisation, user-interface)
  • TEI encoded data in the context of quantitative text analysis
  • Integrating the TEI with other technologies and standards
  • TEI as metadata standard
  • TEI as interchange format: sharing, mapping, and migrating data (in particular in relation to other formats or software environments)

In addition, we are seeking proposals for 5 minute micropaper presentations focused on experiences with the TEI guidelines gained from running projects and discussing one specific feature.

Submission Types

Individual paper presentations will be allocated 30 minutes: 20 minutes for delivery, and 10 minutes for questions & answers.

Panel sessions will be allocated 1.5 hours and may be of varied formats, including:

* three paper-panels: 3 papers on the same or related topics

* round table discussion: 5-8 presenters on a single theme. Ample time should be left for questions & answers after brief optional presentations.

Posters (including tool demonstrations) will be presented during the poster session. The local organizer will provide flip charts and tables for poster session/tool demonstration presenters, along with wireless internet access. Each poster presenter is expected to participate in a slam immediately preceding the poster session.

Micropapers will be allocated 5 minutes.

Submission Procedure

All proposals should be submitted via conftool, the availability of which will be announced shortly. Please submit your proposals by May 15, 2012.

If you don’t have already one, you will need to create an account (i.e., username and password) in order to file a submission. For each submission, you may upload files to the system after you have completed filling out demographic data and the abstract.

* Individual paper or poster proposals (including tool demonstrations): Supporting materials (including graphics, multimedia, etc., or even a copy of the complete paper) may be uploaded after the initial abstract is submitted. Submission should be made in the form of an abstract of 750-1500 words (plus bibliography).

* Micropaper: The procedure is the same as for an individual paper, however the abstract should be no more than 500 words. Please be sure the abstract mentions the TEI feature to be presented!

* Panel sessions (three paper panels): The panel organizer submits a proposal for the entire session, containing a 500-word introduction explaining the overarching theme and rationale for the inclusion of the papers, together with a 750-1500 words section for each panel member.

* Panel sessions (round table discussion): The panel organizer submits a proposal of 750-1500 words describing the rationale for the discussion and includes the list of panelists. Panelists need to be contacted by the panel organizer and have expressed their willingness in participation before submission.

All proposals will be reviewed by the program committee and selected external reviewers.

Those interested in holding working paper sessions outside the meeting session tracks should contact the meeting organizers at meeting@tei-c.org to schedule a room.

Please send queries to meeting@tei-c.org.

Conference submissions will be considered for conference proceedings, edited as a special issue of the Journal of the Text Encoding Initiative. Further details on the submission process will be forthcoming.

For the International Programme Committee,

Elena Pierazzo (programme committee chair)

——-
Dr Elena Pierazzo
Lecturer in Digital Humanities
Chair of the Teaching Committee
Department of Digital Humanities
King’s College London
26-29 Drury Lane
London WC2B 5RL

Phone: 0207-848-1949
Fax: 0207-848-2980
elena.pierazzo@kcl.ac.uk
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/ddh

Release of 2.0.1 of TEI P5 Published

The 2.0.1 release of TEI P5 is a minor release fixing a number of bugs pointed out with the 2.0.0 release. The 2.0.0 release of TEI P5 was a major new release of the TEI P5 Guidelines, which introduces some significant new material as well as implementing an unusually large set of other changes and error corrections. Since the last release in March 2011, members of the TEI community have proposed over 60 feature requests and reported about the same number of errors; dealing with these has kept the TEI Council busy, and most of these tickets have now been closed. See further the release notes http://www.tei-c.org/release/doc/tei-p5-doc/readme-2.0.1.html.

Release 2.0.0 of TEI P5 published

This is a major new release of the P5 Guidelines, which introduces some significant new material as well as implementing an unusually large set of other changes and error corrections. Since the last release in March 2011, members of the TEI community have proposed over 60 feature requests and reported about the same number of errors; dealing with these has kept the TEI Council busy, and most of these tickets have now been closed. See further the release notes at http://www.tei-c.org/release/doc/tei-p5-doc/readme-2.0.html

Call for TEI Project Info

All,

The TEI Projects page at http://www.tei-c.org/Activities/Projects/index.xml has
been gathering entries for quite a few years, and not surprisingly some of the
information in the entries is obsolete or out of date. TEI Council has discussed
migrating the information here to a more user-friendly database-like interface,
but that may not happen for a while.

In the meantime, I have just gone through the existing entries and fixed broken
links. I am sure that other information (contact email, etc.) needs updating as
well. If you are responsible for a project listed on that page and want to make
any changes, could you please email the details to me?

Also, you can submit new projects here: http://www.tei-c.org/Activities/Projects/newform.html

Four projects on the list seem to be entirely missing from the Web. If anyone
can provide me with working links to them, I will update; otherwise I will
remove them from this list in a week or so:

The Anglo-Saxon Poetry Project
http://www.tei-c.org/Activities/Projects/an01.xml

The Cursus Project
http://www.tei-c.org/Activities/Projects/cu01.xml

Project Lorelei
http://www.tei-c.org/Activities/Projects/lo01.xml

The Sternberg Project
http://www.tei-c.org/Activities/Projects/st01.xml

Thanks for assistance,

David Sewell, dsewell@virginia.edu
TEI webmaster

TEI Community Initiative Grants

TEI Community Initiative Grants
Proposals Due 15 December 2011
Total Call: $4,000

The TEI Board is delighted to announce a call for Community Initiative
Grants. Proposed projects proposed should support and promote the goals
of the TEI and should be carried out within one year of the date of the
award.

Applications will be adjudicated according to the following criteria:

* excellence of the proposal;

* contribution of the activity to the promotion and development of the TEI;

* track record of individuals or group proposing the activity;

* deliverables which are realistic and can be accomplished within the
budget and time period proposed.

Although there is no upper amount for any individual proposal,
applicants should bear in mind that the total amount for this grant call
is $4,000.

Proposals should be no longer than three pages (ca. 750 words) and
should contain the following information:

1. Name and contact details of proposer
2. Name of organization (if the proposal is being submitted on behalf of
a TEI SIG or other organistion)
3. Narrative addressing the criteria above.
4. Amount requested. Please indicate if it would be possible to carry
out the activity with less funding, and if so, how that would change the
nature of the proposal.
5. Date for final report

Please send submissions to Susan Schreibman by 15 December 2011

--
Susan Schreibman, PhD
Long Room Hub Senior Lecturer in Digital Humanities
School of English
Trinity College Dublin
Dublin 2, Ireland

email: susan.schreibman@tcd.ie
phone: +353 1 896 3694
fax:  +353 1 671 7114

check out the new MPhil in Digital Humanities at TCD
http://www.tcd.ie/English/postgraduate/digital-humanities/

2011 Board and Council Election Results

[original source, TEI-L:
http://listserv.brown.edu/archives/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind1110&L=TEI-L&T=0&F=&S=&P=12010]

Dear TEI-L,

I am writing, as Chair of the 2011 Nominations Committee, to announce
the results of the recent TEI elections for Board and Technical
Council.

New Board members (serving two-year terms, January 2012 through December 2013):

- Marjorie Burghart
- Laura Mandell
- Martin Mueller
- Elena Pierazzo

New Technical Council members (serving two-year terms, January 2012
through December 2013):

- Brett Barney
- Gabriel Bodard
- Kevin Hawkins
- Martin Holmes
- Paul Schaffner
- Rebecca Welzenbach

Please join me in welcoming our new Board and Technical Council
members and in thanking all those who participated in the elections.

I'd also like to thank my fellow committee members: Marin Dacos, Kevin
Hawkins, and Dan O'Donnell.

Sincerely,

John Walsh
Chair, 2011 Nominations Committee
-- 
| John A. Walsh
| Assistant Professor, School of Library and Information Science
| Indiana University, 1320 East Tenth Street, Bloomington, IN 47405
| www: <http://www.slis.indiana.edu/faculty/jawalsh/>

| Voice:812-856-0707 Fax:812-856-2062 <mailto:jawalsh@indiana.edu>

TEI Elections Open

Subject: TEI elections open
From: Unsworth, John M
Date: Sun, 2 Oct 2011 16:50:29 +0000

Folks,

Email has been sent to designated electors from TEI member institutions, inviting them to vote in the elections for Board and Council. Candidates’ statements on a variety of questions having to do with the future of the TEI can be found at: http://www.tei-c.org/Membership/Meetings/2011/mm54.xml

TEI member institutions eligible to vote are listed at http://www.tei-c.org/Membership/current.xml. If you are at one of those institutions and want to know who your institutional elector is, or if your institution is not listed and you believe it should be, contact membership@tei-c.org.

Many thanks to all the candidates and electors for participating in the election, and to all of you for helping me put together the questions candidates have addressed in their statements.

John Unsworth
[Interim chair, TEI Board]

TEI Consortium Support for TEI P4 (survey)

Dear TEI-L

When the TEI Consortium released TEI P5 in November 2007 it
promised 5 years of ongoing support for TEI P4. Support for TEI
P4 will continue until November 2012. As this is just over a
year away the TEI Technical Council thought it should gradually
phase out support for TEI P4 over this period.

As a first step in this direction it has been suggested that we
de-emphasize TEI P4 on the website (e.g. by stopping search
engines indexing it). Before proceeding with this we want to
gauge how many ongoing/active projects there might be out there
still using TEI P4 and so have set up the following survey:

http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/2N95CY5

This collects some information we will use to assess how much TEI
P4 is still being used and what steps we should take in phasing
out its support. It also collects some additional information
potentially of use to the TEI Technical Council. TEI P4 has,
since the publication of TEI P5, been considered deprecated and
since then we have encouraged use of TEI P5 by new projects. Even
if you have never used TEI P4, only TEI P5, we would appreciate
you filling in the survey so we can capture that (negative
results are indeed results in this case).

Many thanks,

-James

TEI Conference Reminder

From: Malte Rehbein, malte.rehbein@uni-wuerzburg.de

This is a reminder that the registration for the TEI conference is now  open and that the early registration discount is available only until 31  August. Please check out the conference website (http://www.zde.uni-wuerzburg.de/tei_mm_2011/ ) for the programme (now final!) including keynotes, papers, micropapers and posters as well as pre-conference workshops and tutorials and excursions. Information about travelling and lodging is also available.

Statement from interim TEI Board Chair John Unsworth

From: John Unsworth
To: The TEI Community
Date: August 18, 2011

On August 11, Martin Mueller resigned as Chair of the Board of the Text Encoding Initiative Consortium, following a vote of no confidence from the TEI’s Board of Directors.  Since then, there has been a great deal of speculation on the TEI-L email list, on Twitter, and elsewhere, about how this came to pass and what it means.  The purpose of this statement is to replace speculation with an account of events that has the endorsement of both Martin Mueller and the Board of Directors.

On August 17th, the Board appointed and unanimously elected me to serve as interim Chair for the remainder of Martin’s original term.  At the end of that term, I will not stand for election or seek a new appointment as Chair.  As many of you know, I helped to establish the TEI as a non-profit membership organization in 2000, and served as the first Chair of its Board and later of its Council. My goal in serving as interim Chair for the next year and a half will be to address operational needs, to restore equanimity, and to ensure that there is a full and open discussion of strategic priorities.

Contrary to speculation, the change in leadership at the TEI was not a result of Martin’s thoughtful August 4th, 2011 letter to the Board (see http://bit.ly/nG0Ga2). The issues that he raises in that letter are important and should be taken up by the community.  As Chair, Martin focused his attention on finding a new Treasurer, finding ways to bring down costs, bringing in new members, and finding ways to stabilize and improve TEI’s place in the landscape of digital humanities.  All of these were and are critical problems and useful strategic activities for the Chair.

The core issues leading up to Martin’s resignation were differences of opinion about the nature and purpose of the Board itself, and about day-to-day priorities in the business of the TEI (partly having to do with the sequencing of elections and appointments), the relationship between Board and Council, spending priorities (with respect to SIGs, professional services, and meetings), and the role of the Chair, a position described in the TEI Bylaws as one that “shall, subject to the direction of the Board of Directors, generally supervise and manage the affairs of the TEI-C.”  Disagreements over these issues developed within the Board, and between some Board members and their Chair.  Some Board members felt important tasks were going unattended to, and differed with the Chair on strategic priorities. Others, including the Chair, felt that the Board was not efficient in its deliberations, and was excessively concerned with procedure.

In the end, these disagreements about priorities and leadership style hardened into irreconcilable differences.  On August 11,  the Chair called a meeting to discuss budget matters, and four of six voting members, a quorum of the Board, attended.  A vote of confidence was called but failed to pass, and Martin resigned.  A brief account of that meeting was published on August 15 on TEI-L, and it is available at http://bit.ly/pqyGsJ.

The purpose of the foregoing is to explain how we arrived where we are; it is not meant to decide who got us here.  I am certain that everyone involved felt they were doing the best thing for the TEI, but the situation needs to be de-polarized.  We’re a community of people with significant shared interests and values, but we are also a minority in some important larger communities, so it’s in our interest to focus on what we share, and to design and pursue a collective strategy with respect to those larger communities.  In order to plan that strategy, and attend to its implementation, the community needs to speak on issues both conceptual and operational, and the Board and Council need to listen.  In fact, I am sure they would welcome mandates from the community.

Some procedural issues have been raised, on Twitter and on TEI-L, that also need to be addressed.  There has been much speculation regarding the Board’s structure and its decision-making process in the case at hand. The Board consists (as it has always consisted) of voting and non-voting members.  All of its voting members are elected by TEI member institutions.  Officers of the Board are elected (and if necessary, appointed) by the rest of the Board.  The question has also been raised whether the Board exceeded its authority by calling a vote of no confidence.  The bylaws do not provide explicit advice on the proper procedure for removing a Chair, but logically there must be one, and if the Chair is elected by the Board, the Board must be able to vote to replace him or her.  There has also been speculation about whether recently approved changes to the TEI Bylaws were in some way a backdrop for these events.  Both the old and the new bylaws stipulate the same procedures for appointing a Chair and for repopulating the Board.  Both old and new bylaws say that a Chair may be either an elected Board member or an appointed one: Martin was appointed by the Board, so his departure as Chair entails his departure from the Board, but it does not create the sort of vacancy that necessitates a special election by member institutions.

Finally, on behalf of the Board, I invite discussion of the TEI’s future strategy and operations, with the hashtag #teifuture on Twitter, and the subject line “Future of the TEI” on TEI-L.

User survey: have you ever used any element other than tei:add and tei:del as a child of tei:subst?

TEI Council has recently been discussing the correct content model of tei:subst. It is our considered opinion (see http://purl.org/TEI/FR/3393244 ) that the only appropriate children of tei:subst are tei:add and tei:del.

The schema and the guidelines currently allow the elements (corr orig reg sic unclear app damage restore supplied surplus) in subst, but in our opinion this is an error, and we propose to fix it in the future. (These may all of course be children of add or del, which would be the appropriate way to nest them inside one part or the other of a substitution.)

Because we are concerned with backward compatibility and finding a sensible path toward deprecation of old content models, we would like to hear on-list from anybody who uses or has used any element other than add and del as a direct child of subst. Will your XML be broken by future versions of the TEI schema that restrict this usage? What were these elements attempting to represent? Can we find a more canonical way to express what you were trying to say with this combination of elements?

Please pass this question on to any TEI users you know who may not be on this mailing list.

Best,

Gabby


Dr Gabriel BODARD
(Research Associate in Digital Epigraphy)

Department of Digital Humanities
King’s College London
26-29 Drury Lane
London WC2B 5RL

Statement from the TEI Technical Council

Dear TEI community and board,

Following the recent events, the TEI council discussed the issue on a telephone conference yesterday and wished unanimously to express the following statement.

Laurent Romary
INRIA & HUB-IDSL
laurent.romary@inria.fr

A statement from the TEI Technical Council on the recent actions of the TEI Board of Directors

The TEI Technical Council is shocked and saddened by the sudden actions at the TEI Board of Directors which led to the resignation of its chair and the implications this may have for the ability of the TEI Board of Directors to work effectively as representatives of the TEI community.

The TEI Technical Council appreciated the willingness of the outgoing chair to provide a vision for the TEI that could have contributed to reforming the TEI Consortium as an organization. We believe that the events announced by the TEI Board of Directors on 15 August 2011, pending greater explanation, have caused real harm to the TEI Consortium, and we wish to know the Board’s plans for restoring the Consortium’s reputation and good standing in the community.

The TEI Technical Council continues to function and wants to get on with its job of improving and openly maintaining the Guidelines and associated systems and resources on behalf of the TEI community. We hope that the TEI Board of Directors will consider the issues that the outgoing chair raised as it moves forward, and we desire a greater transparency and accountability in TEI Board of Directors activities, notwithstanding the minutes of meetings it already publishes. We call for reforms that introduce mechanisms to make TEI Board of Directors activities more transparent and built on greater consultation with the TEI community.

NISO/DCMI Webinar: International Bibliographic Standards, Linked Data, an the Impact on Library Cataloging

NISO/DCMI August webinar announcement

***Please excuse cross-posting***

————————————————————————————
NISO/DCMI Webinar: “International Bibliographic Standards, Linked Data, and the Impact on Library Cataloging”
DATE: 24 August 2011
TIME: 1:00pm – 2:30pm EDT (17:00-19:30 UTC)
REGISTRATION: http://www.niso.org/news/events/2011/dcmi/linked
————————————————————————————-

ABOUT THE WEBINAR

The International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) is responsible for the development and maintenance of International Standard Bibliographic Description (ISBD), UNIMARC, and the “Functional Requirements” family for bibliographic records (FRBR), authority data (FRAD), and subject authority data (FRSAD). ISBD underpins the MARC family of formats used by libraries world-wide for many millions of catalog records, while FRBR is a relatively new model optimized for users and the digital environment. These metadata models, schemas, and content rules are now being expressed in the Resource Description Framework language for use in the Semantic Web.

This webinar provides a general update on the work being undertaken. It describes the development of an Application Profile for ISBD to specify the sequence, repeatability, and mandatory status of its elements. It discusses issues involved in deriving linked data from legacy catalogue records based on monolithic and multi-part schemas following ISBD and FRBR, such as the duplication which arises from copy cataloging and FRBRization. The webinar provides practical examples of deriving high-quality linked data from the vast numbers of records created by libraries, and demonstrates how a shift of focus from records to linked-data triples can provide more efficient and effective user-centered resource discovery services.

SPEAKERS:

Gordon Dunsire is a freelance consultant with 25 years of experience working in academic libraries and ten years in digital library research. He is a member of IFLA’s ISBD/XML Study Group and FRBR Review Group, and he chairs the IFLA Namespaces Task Group. He is currently a member of a W3C Incubator Group on Library Linked Data.

Thomas Baker, Chief Information Officer (Communications, Research and Development) of the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative, was recently co-chair of the W3C Semantic Web Deployment Working Group and currently co-chairs a W3C Incubator Group on Library Linked Data.

REGISTRATION:

For registration and webinar technical information, see http://www.niso.org/news/events/2011/dcmi/linked.  Registration closes at 12:00 pm Eastern on 24 August 2011.  Webinar presentation slides and Q&A will be posted to the site following the live webinar.  Registrants will
receive access information to the archived webinar following the event. An e-mail message containing archive access instructions will be sent within 48 hours of the event.

Call for Nominations for TEI Board and Council

Call for Nominations (DUE: 2011-09-09)

Dear members of the TEI community,

The Text Encoding Initiative Consortium (TEI-C) invites nominations for election to the TEI-C Board and Council. There will be two terms expiring on the Board and six on the Council. Nominations should be sent to the nomination committee at [nominations at tei-c.org] by September 9, 2011.  Members of the nomination committee this year are John Walsh (chair), Marin Dacos, Kevin Hawkins, and Daniel O’Donnell. The elections will take place via electronic voting prior to the annual Members’ Meeting in October 2011.

Self-nominations are welcome and common. All nominees should provide a brief statement of interest and biographical paragraph, and notice that, if elected, they will be willing to serve.  Example candidates’ biographies from a previous election can be found at  http://www.tei-c.org/Membership/Meetings/2010/mm52.xml.

All nominations should include an email address for the nominee and should indicate whether the nomination is for Board or Council.

The TEI-C Board is the governing body for the TEI Consortium, and is responsible for its strategic and financial oversight. The TEI-C Council oversees the technical development of the TEI Guidelines. Service in either group is an opportunity to help the TEI grow and serve its members better.

For more information on the Board please see: http://www.tei-c.org/About/board.xml.

For more information on the Council please see: http://www.tei-c.org/Activities/Council/index.xml.

TEI-C membership is NOT a requirement to serve on the Board or Council.  Candidates should be familiar with the TEI and should be willing to commit time to discussion, decision-making, and TEI activities. If you have ideas about how to make the TEI stronger or can help it do a better job, please nominate yourself! Or, if you know someone who you think could contribute to TEI, nominate him or her.

Thank you,

John Walsh (for the TEI nominating committee)

TEI XSL stylesheets version 5.53

I have just made a release of my stylesheet family to the usual places (Sourceforge, Debian, TEI web site), and it will also appear in the next release of oXygen. I would urge any regular readers to update, and report errors to me ASAP.

Covered by this release are:

– many improvements to conversion to/from Word and OpenOffice
– many changes to ePub generation (can now generate fixed-format file-per-page format and media overlays)
– rewriting to/from Word/OpenOffice, and to ePub, as Ant tasks, allowing them to be called from within oXygen
– starting support for HTML5 output, with microdata
– no doubt adding new bugs. sigh.


Sebastian Rahtz
Head of Information and Support Group, Oxford University Computing Services

Text-Image Linking Environment 1.0

[Please note that there is a workshop on TILE being offered at the TEI
Member’s Meeting at the University of Würzburg, Germany, 10-16 October]

http://mith.info/tile/

The TILE team is pleased to announce the release of version 1.0. The Text-Image Linking Environment (TILE) is a web-based tool for creating and editing image-based electronic editions and digital archives of humanities texts. This version of TILE includes:

– Import/export of TEI P5, and the ability to easily create custom data
importers
– Improved workflow and accuracy using the Auto Line Recognizer (ALR)
– An improved API for plugin developers
– Enhancements and bug fixes to TILE’s interface
– Detailed release notes for more information

A MITH-hosted sandbox version of TILE allows you to test the tool online without installing it on your machine. We encourage users to download a copy to install on their own servers to customize the tool. Users can import their own data into the software, or get started by playing with pre-loaded data of Algernon Swinburne’s poem Anactoria, provided by John Walsh at Indiana University.

The development of TILE has been supported by an NEH Preservation and Access Grant, and it is a collaboration between the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (Dave Lester, Grant Dickie, Jim Smith, Doug Reside) and Indiana University (Dot Porter, John Walsh, Jeffrey Mudge, Tim Bowman). We’d love to hear how you are using TILE, and what questions or suggestions you have, either in blog comments or on the TILE forums.

Dot Porter (MA, MSLS)
Digital Medievalist, Digital Librarian

Online Registration for TEI Conference

Dear all,

Registration for the TEI Members’ Meeting and Conference in Würzburg is now possible via the TEI online store. Please follow the link from the conference’s website:
http://www.zde.uni-wuerzburg.de/tei_mm_2011/registration/

Make sure to secure your early registration discount and don’t forget to book accommodation as soon as possible as the contingents we have reserved are limited.

We are looking forward to seeing many of you in Würzburg!
On behalf of the local organizers and the program committee

Malte


Dr. Malte Rehbein

XML Holland TEI Code Challenge

XML Code Challenge

Are you able to code TEI files into an EPUB file using only XML standards like XProc and XSLT 2.0?

What is the challenge?

Develop an XProc pipeline in which a TEI encoded Multatuli book is converted to a valid EPUB file that can be sent to a book publisher/distributor like Centraal Boekhuis.

The intention is to prepare the book Millioenen-studiën by Multatuli for electronic publication by Centraal Boekhuis. The Digital Library of Dutch Literature (DBNL) has made a source file available that must be converted into an ePUB file that meets the requirements of Centraal Boekhuis. The book contains running text, but also pictures, footnotes, and some tables.

What can I win?

There are two prizes:

The first prize consists of:

  • A visit to a leading International XML Conference
  • A beautiful certificate
  • The title of “Open Standards Developer 2011”

The winner will also present his or her application during the XMLHolland Annual Conference (XMLAmsterdam 2011).

The second prize winner will receive a free pass to the XML Holland conference.

What do the judges expect?

We expect you to use (at least) XProc and XSLT 2.0. These standards claim to offer extensive opportunities to develop applications for processing XML files. With this competition, we challenge you to show whether these standards are actually suitable for developing a complete XML application. Or is a real programming language still required?

Using a programming language besides XSLT 2.0 is allowed, but the less programming done in other languages, the more the solution will be appreciated. The goal is a solution based entirely on open standards.

We will judge the entries on the application of the standards, the code and performance. Obviously the output files should be valid EPUB files. They must in any case easily open in Adobe Digital Editions. We will validate the files with EpubCheck 1.2, the same validation that is required by Centraal Boekhuis. Furthermore, the panel will also evaluate the quality of the e-books. Do they look good, do internal links work, is the front cover shown, how are foot- and endnotes dealt with, are the pictures in the right place, is the table of contents correct and is the metadata present?

What should I deliver?

Turn in your solution with the output, the source code and instructions that will enable the judges to create the EPUB themselves using your program.

When should I deliver?

Send in submissions by Oct. 19, 2011 to voorzitter@xmlholland.nl

Who are the judges? The panel consists of experts with a proven track record in the open standards community. For
XMLHolland Code Challenge 2011, the following people will be judges:

  • Patrick Steenvoorden, manager Digitale Diensten at Centraal Boekhuis
  • Irsan Widarto, co-founder and CTO of X-Hive, now Director of XML Engineering at EMC
  • René van Stipriaan, co-founder of Digitale database voor de Nederlandse Letteren (www.dbnl.org)
  • Bas Peters, solutions architect at VLC and experienced developer and architect in the world of XML, Open Standards and Open Source
  • Sebastian Rahtz, Information Manager of Oxford University Computing Services and XML expert, especially TEI

Request for Proposals: TEI Conference and Members Meeting, 2012

The TEI Conference and Members’ Meeting takes place every year, usually in late October or early November. As far as possible, the venue alternates between Europe and North America. Previous hosts have included the University of Würzburg Centre for Digital Editing (2011), the University of Zadar (2010), the University of Michigan Libraries (2009), King’s College London (2008), and the University of Victoria (2006). The format of the event is not fixed, but generally keeps the following pattern:

  • 2 or 3 days of pre-conference workshops
  • 3 days of conference sessions, keynote lectures, poster sessions, and meetings of TEI Special Interest Groups

The Annual General Meeting for members of the TEI Consortium is also held during the event. Accounts are presented and election results declared at this AGM, which is open to the public.

The three days of the main conference normally take place between the Thursday and Saturday of the week of the conference. The pre-conference workshops may vary in length from a single morning or afternoon to a full two days.
Attendance at the conference has varied between about 70 and 200, to some extent depending on location, but 100 is the usual average attendance. The TEI Consortium will subsidize a share of the direct costs incurred in running the event, up to a maximum of US$5200. Bids should include a budget indicating the level of additional funding anticipated and its likely source (local institutions, commercial sponsorship etc.) The TEI normally charges and retains a small attendance fee, in the region of $100 to covers its own overheads to ensure that it is able to underwrite the cost of future conferences.

Bids for the 2012 conference must be received no later than 1 September 2011. Institutions considering making a proposal are requested to contact the chair of the TEI Board (martinmueller@northwestern.edu) as soon as possible to discuss their proposal. Completed bids should include the following information:

  • The name of the institution(s) making the bid and a list of proposed members of the local organising team
  • The name, address, email, and telephone number of a contact person
  • A brief description of the facilities available for the event (rooms, equipment, technical support, food)
  • A preliminary budget

In submitting bids, local organisers are strongly encouraged to be creative: the TEI meeting is an expression of the TEI community in all its diversity and should be seen as an opportunity to showcase local interests and strengths.

Bids will be reviewed by the TEI board deuring September, and a decision taken in time to announce the venue at the 2011 Meeting in Wurzburg.

Journal of the Text Encoding Initiative: Inaugural Edition

On behalf of the editors, I am delighted to announce the publication of the first issue of this new peer-reviewed publication:

Journal of the Text Encoding Initiative (jTEI)

This issue, guest edited by Syd Bauman, Kevin Hawkins, and Malte Rehbein, contains selected papers presented at the 2008 and 2009 conferences and members’ meetings:

  • John Unsworth – “Computational Work with Very Large Text Collections: Interoperability, Sustainability, and the TEI”
  • Tanya Clement – “Knowledge Representation and Digital Scholarly Editions in Theory and Practice”
  • Thomas Schmidt – “A TEI-based Approach to Standardising Spoken Language Transcription”
  • Lynne Siemens, Ray Siemens, Hefeng (Eddie) Wen, Cara Leitch, Dot Porter, Liam Sherriff, Karin Armstrong, and Melanie Chernyk – “‘The Apex of Hipster XML GeekDOM’: TEI-encoded Dylan and Understanding the Scope of an Evolving Community of Practice”

The journal is published by the TEI Consortium on Revues.org,  the web platform for journals and book collections of Cléo, the French Centre for Open Electronic Publishing.

jTEI’s home is at jtei.revues.org where you can find information about the journal as well as links to the journal’s administrative website, which is used for managing the submission, review, and editing process.

I hope you enjoy reading this issue. Please consider contributing to the journal by submitting articles for future issues. We also welcome ideas for special issues.

Susan Schreibman
Editor-in-Chief
Journal of the Text Encoding Initiative


Susan Schreibman, PhD
Long Room Hub Senior Lecturer in Digital Humanities
School of English
Trinity College Dublin
Dublin 2, Ireland

email: susan.schreibman@tcd.ie
phone: +353 1 896 3694
fax: +353 1 671 7114

Digital Humanities Workshops at Brown University

Registration is now open for the Brown University Women Writers Project’s summer and fall workshops on topics in TEI and digital humanities:

http://www.wwp.brown.edu/outreach/seminars/

These workshops are aimed at humanities faculty, librarians, students, and anyone interested in getting a strong introduction to digital humanities concepts, methods, and tools. Each workshop combines hands-on practice with discussion and lectures, and participants are encouraged to work with their own project materials. These small group events offer an opportunity to learn about other digital projects as well as to master important methods and concepts in an exploratory
setting.

More information, including detailed workshop descriptions and registration information, can be found at http://www.wwp.brown.edu/outreach/seminars/

Students and members of the TEI consortium receive a 33% discount on registration.

All workshops are held at Brown University. Space is limited so please register early.

July 20-22, 2011
Introduction to XSLT for Digital Humanities
Syd Bauman and David Birnbaum
$450 ($300 for students and TEI members)

August 29-31, 2011
Introduction to TEI Customization
Julia Flanders and Syd Bauman
$450 ($300 for students and TEI members)

September 26-28, 2011
Introduction to Text Encoding and Contextual Information with TEI
Julia Flanders and Syd Bauman
$450 ($300 for students and TEI members)

December 5-7, 2011
Introduction to Manuscript Encoding with TEI
Julia Flanders and Syd Bauman
$450 ($300 for students and TEI members)

We hope to see you in Providence!

best wishes, Julia

Julia Flanders
Director, Women Writers Project
Center for Digital Initiatives, Brown University Library
http://www.wwp.brown.edu
http://library.brown.edu/cds/

Balisage Call for Late-breaking News

Proposals for Late-breaking News presentations at Balisage are due June 10th.

http://www.balisage.net/latebreaking-call.html

The peer-reviewed part of the Balisage 2011 program has been scheduled (http://www.balisage.net/2011/Program.html). A few slots have been reserved for presentation of “Late-breaking” material.  In order to be in serious contention for addition to the final program, your proposal should be either:

a) really late-breaking (it reports on something that happened in the last month or two) or
b) a well-developed paper, an extended paper proposal, or a very long abstract with references on a topic related to Markup and not already on the 2011 conference program.

The competition for late-breaking slots is fiercer than for regular peer-reviewed papers. Now is the time to start writing or to encourage someone you want to hear from at Balisage to get to work.

For more information see: http://www.balisage.net/latebreaking-call.html

or send email to: info@balisage.net

Digital.Humanities@Oxford Summer School 2011

This is a reminder that we are running a comprehensive 5 day Summer School in Digital Humanities this summer.
It takes place from July 25th-29th, at Oxford University Computing Services and Wolfson College.

The summer school introduces a range of digital research components to researchers, project managers, research assistants, or students working on any kind of project concerned with the creation or management of digital data for the humanities.

Please visit http://digital.humanities.ox.ac.uk/DHSS2011/ for details.

The summer school is a collaboration for Digital.Humanities@Oxford between Oxford University Computing Services (OUCS),Oxford e-Research Centre (OERC), e-Research South, and Wolfson College Digital Research Cluster, under the direction of Sebastian Rahtz and Dr James Cummings at OUCS.

The programme will consist of:

• Two parallel streams of morning practical sessions using the well-equipped It teaching facilities at OUCS
• Two parallel streams of afternoon workshops at Wolfson College concentrating on techniques and best practice
• Guest lectures from Digital Humanities experts about their research projects

Our guest plenary speakers for this year include:

David De Roure, Professor of e-Science at OeRC
Jeni Tennison, UK eGov guru
John Coleman, Director of the Phonetics Laboratory
Min Chen, Professor of Visualization at OeRC
Ray Siemens, Canada Research Chair in Humanities Computing and Professor of English at the University of Victoria

Topics include:
• Best practice for digital linguistic corpora
• Building queryable document-based websites
• Creating community collections and digital outreach
• Creating digital texts in XML using the TEI
• Working with maps
• Critical apparatus and digital genetic editions in TEI
• Database design for humanities projects
• Digital Images for the Humanities
• Digital library technologies and best practice
• Getting funding: quality, impact, sustainability.
• Introduction to copyright and open licensing
• Introduction to document/project modelling
• Introduction to XML databases
• Managing Digital Humanities Projects
• Practical RDF modelling and conversion
• Publishing XML files using XSLT
• RDF querying and visualization
• TEI for linking text and facsimiles
• Tools for analyzing linguistic corpora
• Visualization using jQuery
• Working with audio files
NOTE: Early Bird registration discounts end on 16 May!

VOICE XML Corpus and VOICE 1.1 Online

VOICE XML is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/) and includes all corpus texts in XML format as well as derived HTML and TXT versions of the corpus with reduced mark-up. For more information on VOICE XML see https://www.univie.ac.at/voice/page/corpus_availability_xml and consult
the README file included in the download package.

In addition, the release of VOICE XML also marks the release of VOICE 1.1, an updated version of the corpus that includes minor revisions in some of the corpus texts. As of today, the web interface of VOICE Online
is therefore updated to VOICE 1.1 Online (https://www.univie.ac.at/voice/page/corpus_availability_online).

We hope you will find these additional resources helpful, and we are looking forward to receiving any kind of feedback you might have (please mail to voice@univie.ac.at).

We have recently started a new subsection on VOICE-based publications on our website and would like to invite you to let us know when you (have) publish(ed) or present(ed) work which makes use of VOICE Online and/or VOICE XML.

California Digital Library Announces Release of XTF Version 3.0

California Digital Library Announces Release of XTF Version 3.0

Oakland, CA, April 5, 2011 – The California Digital Library (CDL) is pleased to announce the release of version 3.0 of XTF (http://xtf.cdlib.org/), an open source, highly flexible software application that supports the search, browse and display of heterogeneous digital content.  XTF provides efficient and practical methods for creating customized end-user interfaces for distinct digital content collections and is used by institutions worldwide.

Highlights from the 3.0 release include:

  • Scanned book display support in default UI
  • Stability improvements to index rotation support
  • Globalization and RSS support
  • Further Unicode improvements
  • Many bug fixes

See the full change log (http://xtf.cdlib.org/documentation/changelog/) for further details.

XTF is a combination of Java and XSLT 2.0 that indexes, queries, and displays digital objects and is based on open source software (e.g. Lucene and Saxon).  XTF can be downloaded from the XTF website (http://xtf.cdlib.org/download/) or from the XTF Project page on SourceForge (http://sourceforge.net/projects/xtf/), where the source code can also be found.

The XTF website also provides a self-guided tutorial and a sample of the default installation (http://xtf.cdlib.org:8080/xtf/search), demonstrating the capabilities of the tool out-of-the-box. Both of these resources provide a quick view of the capabilities of XTF prior to download.

Offering a suite of customizable features that support diverse intellectual access to content, XTFinterfaces can be designed to support the distinct tools and presentations that are useful and meaningful to specific audiences.  In addition, XTF offers the following core features:

  • Easy to deploy: Drops directly in to a Java application server such as Tomcat or Resin; has been tested on Solaris, Mac, Linux, and Windows operating systems.
  • Easy to configure: Can create indexes on any XML element or attribute; entire presentation layer is customizable via XSLT.
  • Robust: Optimized to perform well on large documents (e.g., a single text that exceeds 10MB of encoded text); scales to perform well on collections of millions of documents; provides full Unicode support.
  • Extensible:
    • Works well with a variety of authentication systems (e.g., IP address lists, LDAP, Shibboleth).
    • Provides an interface for external data lookups to support thesaurus-based term expansion, recommender systems, etc.
    • Can power other digital library services (e.g., XTF contains an OAI-PMH data provider that allows others to harvest metadata, and an SRU interface that exposes searches to federated search engines).
    • Can be deployed as separate, modular pieces of a third-party system (e.g., the module that displays snippets of matching text).
  • Powerful for the end user:
    • Spell checking of queries
    • Faceted displays for browsing
    • Dynamically updated browse lists
    • Session-based bookbags

These basic features can be tuned and modified.  For instance, the same bookbag feature that allows users to store links to entire books, can also store links to citable elements of an object, such as a note or other reference.

Examples of XTF-based applications both within and outside of the CDL include:

Call for Papers: ‘Digital Resources for Palaeography’ Symposium

‘Digital Resources for Palaeography’ One-Day Symposium
5th September 2011, King’s College London

The ‘Digital Resource and Database of Palaeography, Manuscripts and Diplomatic’ (DigiPal) at the Centre for Computing in Humanities at King’s College London is pleased to announce a one-day symposium on digital resources for palaeography.

In recent years, scholars have begun to develop and employ new technologies and computer-based methods for palaeographic research. The aim of the symposium is to present developments in the field, explore the limits of digital and computational-based approaches, and share methodologies across projects which overlap or complement each other.

Papers of 20 minutes in length are invited on any relevant aspect of digital methods and resources for palaeography and manuscript studies. Possible topics could include:

•       Project reports and/or demonstrations
•       Palaeographical method; ‘Digital’ and ‘Analogue’ palaeography
•       Quantitative and qualitative approaches
•       ‘Scientific’ methods, ‘objectivity’ and the role of evidence in manuscript studies
•       Visualisation of manuscript evidence and data
•       Interface design and querying of palaeographical material

To propose a paper, please send a brief abstract (250 words max) to digipal@kcl.ac.uk. The deadline for receipt of submissions is 8th May 2011. Notice of acceptance will be sent by 20th May 2011.

Dr Stewart J Brookes
Research Associate
Digital Resource for Palaeography
King’s College London

TEI course at Rare Book School, July 4-8, 2011

Rare Book School is currently accepting applications for XML in Action: Creating Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) Texts, taught by David Seaman. The course is a practical exploration of the creation, preservation, and use of electronic texts and their associated images in the humanities, with a special focus on Special Collections materials. This course is aimed primarily (although not exclusively) at librarians, publishers, and scholars keen to develop, use, publish, and control electronic texts for library, research, scholarly communication, or teaching purposes.

The week will center around the creation of a set of archival-quality etexts and digital images (texts such as 18th and 19th century letters, which are short enough to allow each participant to take an entire document through all its creation stages during the course). Topics include: XML tagging and conversion; using the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) Guidelines; Unicode; metadata issues (including a discussion of METS and Open Archives Initiative harvesting), project planning and funding; and the manipulation of XML texts using stylesheets for re-publishing HTML, in ebook formats, and in PDF.

Applicants need to have some experience with the tagging of HTML documents. In their personal statement, they should assess the extent of their present knowledge of the electronic environment, and outline a project to which they hope to apply the skills learned in this course.

The course takes place 4-8 July in Charlottesville, VA. Applications are available online at http://www.rarebookschool.org/applications/

[This course is a revised version of “Introduction to Electronic Texts and Images”, which ran from 1995-2009.]

TEI council face to face meeting 11-13 April 2011

Dear all,

The TEI council will meet face to face in Chicago on 11-13 April next month. Why would you care? Because we will try to work out the various bugs and features documented and discussed in the TEI source forge server: http://tei.sourceforge.net/

It’s a good opportunity for you all to have a look at the ones for which you may have specific interests and provide feedback if necessary. You may also file in bugs or features that you have identified since ages and never took the time to document…The work of the council only makes sense if it reflects the expectations and competences of the community!

Laurent

PS:

  • Bugs:
    http://sourceforge.net/tracker/?group_id=106328&atid=644062
  • Feature requests:
    http://sourceforge.net/tracker/?group_id=106328&atid=644065
  • Laurent Romary
    INRIA & HUB-IDSL
    laurent.romary@inria.fr

    Call for Papers: 2011 TEI Members’ Meeting

    Dear TEIers,
    As you know already, the TEI conference will take place this year in
    Würzburg (Germany) from 13 to 15 October (preceded by workshops and
    tutorials). It is a major event for our community as it is the
    possibility for all of you to exchange your ideas and experience in
    using the TEI guidelines, as well as providing feedback and proposals
    on making the TEI technical environment evolve to serve digital
    scholarship even better.  Indeed, the TEI has become an essential
    aspect for any text-based research in the humanities and our user
    community grows everyday quicker. The conference should be able to
    reflect this variety by bringing together both experienced eHumanists
    and more traditional scholars looking for  digital answers to their
    research questions.
    You will find below the call for paper, which will soon be followed by
    a call for workshops and tutorials. Pleas do not hesitate to spread
    the word further on your favorite social networks.
    I am looking forward to see you all in Würzburg,
    Laurent Romary
    
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Call for papers and proposals
    
    Philology in the Digital Age
    2011 Annual Conference and Members’ Meeting of the TEI Consortium
    University of Würzburg, Germany
    
    http://www.zde.uni-wuerzburg.de/tei_mm_2011/
    
    * Deadline for submissions: May 1st, 2011
    * Meeting dates: Wed 12 October to Sat 15 October, 2011
    * Workshop dates: Mon 10 October to Wed 12 October, 2011 (see separate
    call)
    
    The Program Committee of the 2011 Annual Meeting of the Text Encoding
    Initiative (TEI - www.tei-c.org) Consortium invites individual paper
    proposals, panel
    sessions, poster sessions, and tool demonstrations particularly, but
    not exclusively, on digital texts, scholarly editing or any topic
    that applies TEI to its research.
    
    Submission Topics
    
    Topics might include but are not restricted to:
    	• TEI and scholarly editing
    	• TEI and textual criticism
    	• TEI and the evolution of digital philology
    	• TEI and text corpora
    	• The relation between representation (encoded text) and presentation
    (visualisation, user-interface)
    	• TEI encoded data in the context of quantitative text analysis
    	• Integrating the TEI with other technologies and standards
    	• TEI as metadata standard
    	• TEI as interchange format: sharing, mapping, and migrating data (in
    particular in relation to other formats or software environments)
    
    In addition, we are seeking proposals for 5 minute micropaper
    presentations focused on experiences with the TEI guidelines gained
    from running projects and discussing one specific feature.
    
    Submission Types
    
    Individual paper presentations will be allocated 30 minutes: 20
    minutes for delivery, and 10 minutes for questions & answers.
    Submission should be made in the form of an abstract of 750-1500
    words (plus bibliography).
    
    Panel sessions will be allocated 1.5 hours and may be of varied
    formats, including:
    
        * three paper panels: 3 papers on the same or related topics
    
        * round table discussion: 5-8 presenters on a single theme. Ample
          time should be left for questions & answers after brief
          presentations.
    
    Posters (including tool demonstrations) will be presented during the
    poster session. The local organizer will provide flip charts and
    tables for poster session/tool demonstration presenters, along with
    wireless internet access. Each poster presenter is expected to
    participate in a slam immediately preceding the poster session.
    
    Micropapers will be allocated 5 minutes.
    
    Submission Procedure
    
    All proposals should be submitted at http://www.tei-c.org/conftool/ by
    May 1st, 2011 (please check on the conference website for the
    availability of conftool).
    
    You will need to create an account (i.e., username and password) in
    order to file a submission. For each submission, you may upload files
    to the system after you have completed filling out demographic data
    and the abstract.
    
        * Individual paper or poster proposals (including tool
    demonstrations): Supporting materials (including graphics, multimedia,
    etc., or even a copy of the complete paper) may be uploaded after the
    initial abstract is submitted.
    
        * Micropaper: The procedure is the same as for an individual
    paper, however the abstract should be no more than 500 words. Please
    be sure the abstract mentions the feature to be presented!
    
        * Panel sessions (three paper panels): The panel organizer submits
    a proposal for the entire session, containing a 500-word introduction
    explaining the overarching theme and rationale for the inclusion of
    the papers, together with a 750-1500 words section for each panel
    member.
    
       * Panel sessions (round table discussion): The panel organizer
    submits a proposal of 750-1500 words describing the rationale for the
    discussion and includes the list of panelists. Panelists need to be
    contacted by the panel organizer and have expressed their willingness
    in participation before submission.
    
    All proposals will be reviewed by the program committee and selected
    external reviewers.
    
    Those interested in holding working paper sessions outside the meeting
    session tracks should contact the meeting organizers at meeting@tei-c.org
      to schedule a room.
    
    Please send queries to meeting@tei-c.org.
    
    Conference submissions will be considered for conference
    proceedings, edited as a special issue of the  Journal of the Text
    Encoding Initiative. Further details on the submission process will be
    forthcoming.
    
    For the international programm comittee,
    
    Laurent Romary (programm committee chair)

    Day of Digital Humanities 2011

    Digital humanists are invited to participate in the third annual Day of Digital Humanities, a project tracking 24 hours in the field of digital humanities. On March 18th, 2011 individuals in the field or related professions will document the events of their day with photos and discussion.

    This project is an online collaborative publication, with each participant co-authoring and decisions made communally. However, participating in the Day of DH shouldn’t require a large time commitment. Most of the work will be in uploading short entries and photographs during the documentation day. The degree of involvement beyond that will be up to you. To find out about this interaction and the previous two iterations of the Day of Digital Humanities see:

    http://tapor.ualberta.ca/taporwiki/index.php/Day_in_the_Life_of_the_Digital_Humanities_2011

    This project is intended to bring members of all types and from around the field together to post about what they do and reflect on what others are doing. We particularly encourage graduate students, developers and international colleagues to participate. You don’t have to be “important”; you don’t have to write in English; and you don’t have to have a lot of experience in the field. Your opinions count!

    To participate please fill out the application form by March 15th, 2011.

    Apply now at http://bit.ly/DoDH11-apply

    And mark the 18th of March down for the next Day of Digital Humanities.

    Yours,

    Geoffrey Rockwell

    Ligatus Summer School 2011

     

    The History of European Bookbinding 1450-1830 and Identifying and recording bookbinding structures for conservation and cataloguing.

    Istituto Ellenico di Studi Bizantini e Postbizantini di Venezia, Venice (Italy)

    19-23 and 26-30 September 2011

    The 6th Ligatus Summer School, following the success of the courses in Volos, Patmos, Thessaloniki and Wolfenbüttel, is to be held this year in collaboration with the Istituto Ellenico di Studi Bizantini e Postbizantini di Venezia. We are delighted to announce the summer school in the historic city of Venice and particularly in the Istituto Ellenico, which has a distinguished reputation in the field of book studies. This year students will have the opportunity to see bindings from historic collections in the city, including the Biblioteca Marciana. With access to a range of important libraries and the unique environment that the city offers, this year’s summer school will be a unique experience.
    http://www.ligatus.org.uk/summerschool

    Summer school context:
    The contribution that bindings can make to our understanding of the history and culture of the book is often neglected, but they can offer insights into the study of readership, the booktrade, and the provenance of books which are often not available elsewhere. In order to realise this potential, it is important to understand not only the history of the craft but also to learn how to record what is seen in a consistent and organised way. Librarians, cataloguers, conservators, book historians and all scholars who work with early books, need therefore to understand the structure and materials of the bindings they encounter in order to be able to record and describe them. Such descriptions of bindings are not only valuable for the management of library collections, pursuing academic research and making informed decisions about conservation, but are also important for digitisation projects as they can radically enrich the potential of image and text metadata. It is our belief that bindings should be seen as an integral part of the book, without which, our understanding of the history and use of books is often greatly circumscribed.

    The purpose of the summer school is to uncover the possibilities latent in the detailed study of bookbinding and it mainly focuses on books which have been bound between the fifteenth and the early nineteenth century. While both courses concentrate in particular on the structure and materials of bookbindings, each of the two courses offered in this summer school looks at bindings from different geographical areas and with a different approach. The first course looks at the history of bookbinding as it was carried out in Europe in the period of the hand press (1450-1830), with the opportunity to look at examples from different collections during the afternoons, while the second course looks at the development of bookbinding in the eastern Mediterranean and gives hands-on training in how to observe and record bindings, again working with examples from the collections. Part of this course includes technical hands-on session for the development of a digital documentation system for recording bookbindings.

    The courses are taught in English and each is open to 12 participants. Although the courses can be attended individually, participants are encouraged to attend both courses in order to get a more complete understanding of the issues discussed, through the comparison of the wide range of bookbindings considered in each week. Since these are not beginner-level courses, the participants are expected to be familiar with bookbinding terminology and have a basic knowledge of the history of book production in the periods under discussion. A basic understanding of the use of databases is also desirable for those who will attend the course in the second week.

    Description of courses:

    • Week 1, European Bookbinding 1450-1830
      Tutor: Professor N. Pickwoad
      This course will follow European bookbinding from the end of the Middle Ages to the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, using the bindings themselves to illustrate the aims and intentions of the binding trade. A large part of the course will be devoted to the identification of both broad and detailed distinctions within the larger groups of plain commercial bindings and the possibilities of identifying the work of different countries, cities, even workshops without reference to finishing tools. The identification and significance of the different materials used in bookbinding will be examined, as well as the classification of bookbindings by structural type, and how these types developed through the three centuries covered by the course. The development of binding decoration will be touched on, but will not form a major part of the discussion. The course consists of ten 90-minute sessions with Powerpoint
      presentations (over 800 images will be shown). Actual examples of bindings will be shown in the first four afternoon sessions while the final afternoon will look at bookbinding terminology and offer the opportunity for the discussion of questions and issues raised during the week.
    • Week 2, Identifying and recording bookbinding structures
      Tutors: Dr. G. Boudalis and Dr. A. Velios
      This five-day course will be divided in two interconnected sessions. The first session, run by Dr. Georgios Boudalis, will focus upon the major structural and decorative features of the Byzantine and post-Byzantine bookbindings and their evolution in time and space. The relationship of these bindings with the early bindings of the Coptic and other Eastern Mediterranean cultures will be discussed, during lectures, slide-shows and demonstrations of real bookbindings from Venetian collections. This session will centre on the influences and comparisons of these different bookbindings. It will consist of eight 90-minute computer presentations supplemented by hands-on sessions. The second session will be run by Dr. Athanasios Velios and will deal with the data management and storage of bookbinding descriptions. Alongside a brief reference to the relational databases this session will mainly involve discussions on a) the semantic web and XML, b) schemas and terminologies for bookbinding descriptions, c) commercial and open source software options and d) methodologies and workflows for surveying collection. A large part of this session will be devoted to the actual development and use of a documentation system for recording binding structures and the actual recording of specific bindings. This session will consist of two 90-minutes presentations and eight 90-minutes hands-on workshops. Basic knowledge of database use is desirable for this course.

    The courses are supported by Ligatus and the University of the Arts, London, with generous help from the Istituto Ellenico. We have therefore been able to reduce the cost of the course for this year to £350.00 per week, excluding travel, meals and accommodation. A number of accommodation options will be provided to the participants. A detailed schedule of the courses can be sent upon request.

    Applications, including a short CV can be submitted online (http://www.ligatus.org.uk/summerschool/). For information about registration please email Ewelina Warner (e.warner@camberwell.arts.ac.uk) and mark  the message subject with: ‘Ligatus Summer School’. A reading list will be sent to those who will attend the courses in advance. Deadline for applications is the 1st of July. The participants will be contacted by the end of July.

    About the Istituto Ellenico:
    The Hellenic Institute of Byzantine and Post-Byzantine Studies in Venice was founded in 1955 and is housed in the building of the former Flanghinis College. The Institute’s main objective is to study Byzantine and Post-Byzantine history – focussing primarily on the history of Greek territories under Latin domination, on the basis of Italian and in particular Venetian archives – and to publish the relevant historical sources. Its old library (belonging to the former Flanghinis College) includes 2,000 volumes produced by the Greek printing houses of Venice from the 16th to the 18th century. Most of these old books come from the printing houses of Glykis and Theodosiou, and are mainly ecclesiastical works and school texts; the new library includes 30,000 volumes. The
    library also holds 41 Byzantine and Post-byzantine manuscripts from as early as the 12th century. The Institute’s archive holds an important collection of documents from as early as 1498 which capture the history of Greeks in Venice. For more information about the Institute see:
    http://www.istitutoellenico.org/

    About Venice in September 2011:
    Venice always offers a number of great cultural activities including museums and churches. The summer school coincides with the Venice Biennale exhibition which is another good reason to join us this year. For a calendar of events in Venice see: http://www.comune.venezia.it/flex/FixedPages/IT/Eventi.php/L/EN/YY/2011/MM/9/DD/1

    About Ligatus:
    Ligatus is a research unit of the University of the Arts London with particular interest in the history of bookbinding, book conservation, archiving and the application of digital technology to these fields. Ligatus’s main research projects currently include the conservation of the books in the library of St. Catherine’s Monastery on Mount Sinai and the development of a multi-lingual glossary of bookbinding terms. Find out more about Ligatus here: http://www.ligatus.org.uk

    InterFace 2011 Call for Talks Deadline extended

    With apologies for cross-posting.

    The committee for the 3rd International Symposium for Humanities and Technology, InterFace 2011, has agreed to extend the deadline for applications for participation in the symposium to

      *Friday 11 March 2011*

    Applications are encouraged from Ph.D students and early career researchers in all humanities and computing disciplines. The key component of your application will be a 150-word abstract for your proposed lightning talk.

    You can submit your application here:

    http://www.interface2011.org.uk/submit

    The committee will select participants from among the applications received and successful applicants will be informed on Monday 4 April 2011. If your application is accepted, you will then be invited to register. A participation fee will be charged to cover costs of lunches, refreshments, venue, and speakers. This fee will be £35.

    Key Dates:

    * Friday    11 March   Extended Deadline for applications
    * Monday     4 April   Notification of successful applications
    * Monday    18 April   Deadline for registration for successful applicants
    * Wednesday 27 July    InterFace 2011 begins

    What is InterFace?
    ==================

    InterFace is a symposium for humanities and technology. In 2011 it is being jointly hosted by colleges across London and will be an invaluable opportunity for participants to visit this active hub of digital scholarship and practice.

    The symposium aims to foster collaboration and shared understanding between scholars in the humanities and in computer science, especially where their efforts converge on exchange of subject matter and method. With a focus on the interests and concerns of Ph.D students and early career researchers, the programme will include networking activities, opportunities for research exposition, and various training and workshop activities.

    A core component of the programme will be a lightning talks session in which each participant will make a two-minute presentation on their research. The session will be lively and dynamic. Each presentation must be exactly two minutes long, making use of necessary,interesting, appropriate, or entertaining visual or sound aids, and condensing a whole Ph.D’s worth of ideas and work into this short slot.

    Participants will be able to join workshops in:

  • Data Visualisation
  •  lead by *Andy Hudson Smith* (UCL, Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis) http://www.casa.ucl.ac.uk/people/person.asp?id=7

  • Network Analysis
  •  lead by *Tom Brughmans* (Southampton) and *Marco Buechler*

  • Semantic Web
  • lead by *Joe Padfield* (National Gallery)

  • Bibliographic Software
  • lead by *Ian Mulvany* (VP New Product Development, Mendeley)

    There will be talks on:

  • User Studies
  • given by *Claire Warwick* (UCL, Information Studies)

  • How to Get Published
  • given by *Sarah-Louise Quinnell* (http://www.phd2published.com/) and representatives from Ashgate Publishing.

  • How to Get Funding in the EU and UK
  • given by *Henreitte Brun* (UCL, Laws Faculty)

    There will also be two keynote talks given by speakers whose work marks the leading edge of technology in scholarship and practice. The speakers will be:

    *Melissa Terras* (UCL)

    Digitisation of Cultural Heritage and Image Processing

    *Stephen Scrivener* (University of the Arts, London)

    Design Research and Creative Production

    Finally, the symposium will conclude with an unconference; a participatory, collaborative, and informal event in which the form and content is decided on by participants as it unfolds and in which discussion and production is emphasised over presentation and analysis. Participants may wish to share their own skills, learn a new skill, establish and develop a collaborative project, or hold a focused discussion.

    We look forward to receiving your application.

    The InterFace 2011 Committee

    http://www.interface2011.org.uk/
    enquiries@interface2011.org.uk


    Raffaele Viglianti
    PhD Candidate and PGRA
    Centre for Computing in the Humanities
    King’s College London

    Release of TEI 1.9.0

    The new release of the TEI Guidelines in all its forms is now complete. You can find it by:

  • visiting the TEI Web site and reading the Guidelines athttp://www.tei-c.org/release/doc/tei-p5-doc/en/html/index.html
  • using the schemas etc direct from the web site eg http://www.tei-c.org/release/xml/tei/custom/schema/relaxng/tei_all.rng
  • using Roma at http://www.tei-c.org/Roma/
  • downloading a zip archive from Sourceforge (https://sourceforge.net/projects/tei/files/TEI-P5-all/)
  • subscribing to Ubuntu/Debian packages via http://tei.oucs.ox.ac.uk/teideb/
  • checking out the source files using Subversion from Sourceforge (see https://sourceforge.net/scm/?type=svn&group_id=106328)
  • The nice folks at oXygen will include it all in their next release, I am sure.

    The release notes can be found at http://www.tei-c.org/release/doc/tei-p5-doc/readme-1.9.html

    Please note that this is an interim, largely procedural, release, and has no major additions or changes in functionality.  The TEI Council has been working to simplify the maintenance and releasing of the Guidelines, and it seemed sensible to clear the decks now and resolve any problems in implementation. This could mean another procedural release if something goes hideously wrong :-{

    The TEI Council meets in April and expects to make a release after that which addresses some of the backlog of feature requests.

    There are two important points to bear in mind:

    a) as discussed a few weeks ago, the implementation of global attributes has changed. Each element is now explicitly a member of the att.global class. If you have an ODD which adds new elements in the TEI namespace, it will no longer have global attributes (xml:id, rend etc) added by default.

    b) the web Roma tool has now switched to pass all processing to the OxGarage server, which runs a later (improved) set of ODD-processing stylesheets. You may notice changes (I hope not!). The XSLT 1.0 ODD-processing stylesheets are now removed from the Stylesheets package as they will no longer give the right results.

    The 1.9.0 release of the TEI is accompanied by release 5.50 of the TEI Stylesheets package and release 4.3 of Roma. These are intimately connected, because of the global attributes, so don’t attempt to mix and match unless you know what you are doing.


    Sebastian Rahtz     
    Head of Information and Support Group, Oxford University Computing Services
    13 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6NN. Phone +44 1865 283431

    Deadline Extended: CFP: Proceedings of 2010 TEI Conference and Members Meeting

    The Editors of the Journal of the Text Encoding Initiative are extending the deadline for Issue 2 (papers presented at the 2010 Members Meeting in Zadar) to Monday 11 April.

    Submissions will be accepted in two categories: research articles of 5,000 to 7,000 words and shorter articles reflecting poster session or lightning presentations, or new tools or services of 2000-4000 words. Both may include images and multimedia content.

    Full information for authors can be found here
    http://journal.tei-c.org/journal/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

    If you would like to discuss your a proposed submission with the Journal editors, please email journal [AT ] tei-c.org

    with all best wishes

    Susan Schreibman
    Editor-in-Chief

    MLA CFP: Session Sponsored by the Committee on Scholarly Editions

    MLA 2012: Seattle, January 5-8, 2012

    Reimagining the Scholarly Edition

    Over the past 15 years new theories of editing have broadened the approaches available to editors of scholarly editions. Noteworthy amongst these are the changes brought about by editing for digital publication. New methods for digital scholarship (including but not limited to text encoding, mashups, datamining), forms of editions (such as Thematic Research Collections, Digital Archives, Digital Libraries), theories informing digital publication (including Versioning, Genetic Editing, Unediting), and tools (such as TILE, the Versioning Machine, Omeka) offer exciting supplements or alternatives to traditional notions of the scholarly edition.

    Proposals are being accepted for this Roundtable (up to 8 presenters) that address the theme of digital scholary editons. Please email 300 word abstracts by March 10, 2011 to Susan Schreibman susan.schreibman [AT] gmail.com. All panel participants must be members of MLA before April 1, 2011.

    Women Writers Project’s Introduction to XSLT Workshop

    Space is still available in the Women Writers Project’s upcoming workshop on XSLT:

    Introduction to XSLT for Digital Humanities
    March 30-April 1, 2011
    Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island
    Instructors:
    Syd Bauman, Brown University
    David Birnbaum, University of Pittsburgh
    Cost: $300 ($200 for TEI members and students)
    Registration deadline: March 15, 2011

    This three-day intensive workshop will introduce participants to the fundamental concepts of XSLT, the power tool of the XML world, focusing on the needs and data of digital humanists. Participants will develop stylesheets that explore the basic capacities of XSLT, and will learn how to read and reverse engineer other people’s stylesheets to develop their skills. Familiarity with the TEI and XML is assumed.

    For more information, or to register for the workshop: http://www.wwp.brown.edu/outreach/seminars/

    Julia Flanders
    Director, Women Writers Project

    InterFace 2011: 3rd International Symposium for Humanities and Technology

    InterFace 2011 — 27-29 July 2011, University College London

    InterFace is a symposium for humanities and technology. In 2011 it is being jointly hosted by colleges across London and will be an invaluable opportunity for participants to visit this active hub of digital scholarship and practice.

    The symposium aims to foster collaboration and shared understanding between scholars in the humanities and in computer science, especially where their efforts converge on exchange of subject matter and method. With a focus on the interests and concerns of Ph.D students and early career researchers, the programme will include networking activities, opportunities for research exposition, and various training and workshop activities.

    A core component of the programme will be a lightning talks session in which each participant will make a two-minute presentation on their research. The session will be lively and dynamic. Each presentation
    must be exactly two minutes long, making use of necessary, interesting, appropriate, or entertaining visual or sound aids, and condensing a whole Ph.D’s worth of ideas and work into this short slot.

    Participants will be able to join workshops in:

    • social network analysis
    • bibliographic software
    • data visualisation
    • linked data

    There will be talks on:

    • user studies and social research
    • discourse analysis in science and technology
    • how to get your work published
    • how to apply for research funding

    There will also be two keynote talks given by speakers whose work marks the leading edge of technology in scholarship and practice. The speakers will be:

    • Steven Scrivener (University of Arts London) Design research and creative production
    • Melissa Terras (UCL) Digitisation of cultural heritage and image processing

    Finally, the symposium will conclude with an unconference; a participatory, collaborative, and informal event in which the form and content is decided on by participants as it unfolds and in which discussion and production is emphasised over presentation and analysis. Participants may wish to share their own skills, learn a new skill, establish and develop a collaborative project, or hold a focused discussion.

    We are now seeking applications for participation in InterFace. Applications are encouraged from Ph.D students and early career researchers in all humanities and computing disciplines. The key component of your application will be a 150-word abstract for your proposed lightning talk.

    You can submit your application here:

    http://www.interface2011.org.uk/submit

    The deadline for applications is Friday 25 February 2011.

    The committee will select participants from among the applications received and successful applicants will be informed on Monday 4 April 2011. If your application is accepted, you will then be invited to register. A participation fee will be charged to cover costs of lunches, refreshments, venue, and speakers. This fee will be £35.

    Key Dates:

    • Friday 25 February Deadline for applications
    • Friday 1 April Notification of successful applications
    • Monday 18 April Deadline for registration for successful applicants
    • Monday 27 July InterFace 2011 begins

    CFP: Proceedings of 2010 TEI Conference and Members Meeting

    This is a reminder of the open call for submissions to the TEI Journal. The deadline on Feb. 25 is only a few weeks away, so if you want to submit please do so in time at http://journal.tei-c.org/journal/. For your convenience, the call for papers is repeated below:

    The editors of the Journal of the Text Encoding Initiative, the official journal of the TEI Consortium, are delighted to announce a call for papers for the conference proceedings of the 2010 TEI Conference and Members Meeting. For this issue, the guest editors (Christian Wittern, Syd Bauman, and Hugh Cayless) welcome any article that was presented as a paper, poster, or tool demonstration at the conference.

    The Journal of the Text Encoding Initiative is a freely-available, open-access, peer-reviewed journal hosted by Revues.org. For further details on author and submission guidelines, please see the ‘About’ page.

    Closing date for submissions is 25 February 2011 with publication expected autumn 2011.

    XML Development: From Markup to Application

    April 25-28, 2011, Washington, DC

    Washington DC—The Association of Research Libraries (ARL) is pleased to offer an in-depth workshop focused on Web development with XML.

    Taught by experienced XML instructors and developers Matthew Gibson, Director of Digital Programs at the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities at the University of Virginia, and Patrick Yott, Digital Library Manager at Northeastern University, this four-day workshop will explore XML with a specific focus on fundamentals of design, markup, and use. Participants will use XML and related technologies in the creation of a prototype digital publication.

    Topics to be covered include:

    • XML: What is it? And why should we care about it?
    • Working with content models (primarily XML Schema and some Schematron) and methods of using them when constructing and validating XML
    • Implementing methods of content transformation and delivery (using XSLT and XPath) so the XML we build can be delivered, read, and used in a variety of formats
    • Utilizing Solr, a Lucene-based search server, and XSLT to deliver the final class project

    Participants should have a basic familiarity and some experience with markup (e.g., HTML, some XML, etc.).

    Event Details

    Dates: Monday, April 25 – Thursday, April 28, 2011
    Time: 9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
    Location: George Washington University Marvin Center, Washington, DC
    Fee: $1,500
    Register by March 25, 2011, at http://www.arl.org/stats/statsevents/index.shtml.

    eMunch.no officially online

    The first version, a beta version, of the digital archive of Edvard Munch’s texts is now online at http://www.emunch.no/

    The archive is primarily in Norwegian, but we have start pages in English, French and German (links on flags in the top of the page, in the front page’s main part and in the red menu, so hopefully you’ll manage to find your way). The general information in French and German is limited, I’m afraid, but we will provide more in due time. The texts, mostly letters, written by Munch himself in French and German are directly accessible from the French and German pages. We provide translations in English and French of some of Munch’s texts.

    The encoding guidelines we have used are available in English, cf. the English page. There are also a few articles in English on Munch related themes. Guidelines for transcribing Munch’s texts in French and German are available in French and German alongside articles discussing Munch’s use of French and German.

    The general guidelines for transcribing Munch’s texts will be translated to English in due time. Eventually we will also provide a list of terms used to categorize Munch’s texts in Norwegian – English – French – German, to facilitate browsing even though the archive is in Norwegian. We hope to be able in the years to come to supply the archive with even more resources in English, French and German.

    We also plan to provide some information on the technical aspects of the website. In short, the website is built using Apache Cocoon and the eXist XML database. It is currently hosted by the Unit for Digital Documentation at the University of Oslo.

    We are happy to answer questions and hope to receive feedback from you.

    Thank you!

    Kind regards, Hilde Bøe


    Hilde Bøe
    Scholarly and Technical Editor

    hilde.boe@munch.museum.no | hildeboee@gmail.com
    http://emunch.no/
    http://www.munch.museum.no/